Notary Journals Articles

Notary Journals Raise Issues about Public Records versus Privacy

by American Association of Notaries
Notaries public have access to many items of personal information in order to do a proper job of notarizing. We have to see the entire document to make sure the signer is able to freely and willingly sign. We have to briefly review the document to gather some specifics to record in our notary journals. We have to examine the satisfactory evidence presented that establishes the identity of the signer and record details of that evidence in our journals. Other specific information about the circumstances of the notarization (as covered in other articles in this series) has to be written into the journal as well. (more...)
Also listed in: What Does a Notary Do?

The Contents of a Notary Journal

by American Association of Notaries
There are three primary types of notary journals. One has minimal space per entry; one has more generous space per entry but fewer entries per page; and one is designed for notary signing agents and has frequently-seen real estate documents pre-listed in it. Each of these three types can be found in paperback or hardback. Which type you choose is your decision. It is important to see a sample page of the journal before you buy it, as you will be using it for some time. (more...)

Why a Notary Journal Is Required

by American Association of Notaries
Almost no one likes to do paperwork, especially if they don't have to do it. So, if you tell them that paperwork is not required, most people will be happy to believe you and skip it. When it comes to the notary journal, skipping the paperwork is not an option. Keeping a notary journal is required for the following reasons: (more...)

How long must I retain my notary journals?

by American Association of Notaries
A document signer expects a notary not only to exercise reasonable care in notarizing his or her signature on a document, but also to be able to show evidence, often years after the date of the act, that the notarization was performed in accordance with proper notarial procedures.
Also listed in: Notary Best Practices

Florida Bills Close in on Notary Journal Requirement

by American Association of Notaries
If passed, either of two bills that were filed with Florida legislative bodies at the end of 2013 will significantly update Florida notary laws to include the requirement of keeping a journal of notary acts. The new law would go into effect on July 1, 2014. (more...)
Also listed in: Notary Laws

Notary Supplies That Every Notary Should Have!

by American Association of Notaries
The notary is a public officer and, as such, is required to comply with any reasonable request for notarization. Whether you are a notary with your own notary signing service or an employee notary, it is a good idea to keep essential notary supplies with you at all times so that you may be ready to adequately and efficiently serve the public upon request. (more...)

Notaries: Maintain a Notary Journal!

by American Association of Notaries
The notary's best defense is the notary record book, or notary journal. Some states require notaries to keep a notary record book and some states do not; however, all notaries are encouraged to keep a journal of every notarial act. (more...)

Texas Notaries Are Forbidden From Recording ID Card Numbers

by American Association of Notaries
As of April 22, 2007 Texas Notaries Public Are Forbidden From Recording Identification Card Numbers in Their Notary Record Books. Section 406.014(a)(5) does not require that the personal information on the identification card be recorded in the notary record book. However, notaries public have recorded the driver's license in their notary record books. (more...)
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Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries seeks to provide timely articles for notaries to assist them with information and ideas for managing their notary businesses, enhancing their notary educations, and securing their notary supplies but makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained . Information in this article is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their state if they have legal questions about how to notarize.
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