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Notary Stamp Ink Color: Black or Blue?

by American Association of Notaries
If your state does not address which color ink to use when notarizing documents, ordering a notary stamp with a blue ink color is best. Given the improved quality of copy machines these days, it is difficult to distinguish between originals and copies. A blue ink notary stamp impression usually shows lighter prints than the original print on a black-and-white copier.

However, some states do specify in their laws what notary stamp ink color to use when notarizing documents. For example, notaries in Tennessee are required to use any ink except black or yellow. Florida, Oregon, Missouri, and Illinois require notaries to use notary stamps or notary seals with black ink only. In Utah, a notary stamp ink color cannot be black; it must be purple.

Notarizing documents using an ink color that is not allowed by your state notary laws may jeopardize your commission and subject you to disciplinary action. In addition, it may cause delays and hardship for the document signer.

The American Association of Notaries (AAN) can accommodate notaries with a choice of ink colors on almost any notary stamp or notary seal available on the AAN website. The choices are black, blue, purple, green, and red. The AAN recommends that you choose a notary stamp ink color that reproduces clearly when documents are photocopied.
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Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries seeks to provide timely articles for notaries to assist them with information and ideas for managing their notary businesses, enhancing their notary educations, and securing their notary supplies but makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained . Information in this article is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their state if they have legal questions about how to notarize.
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