Notary Supplies Articles

New Year's "To-Do's" for Notary Professionals

by American Association of Notaries
As business owners, we are either winding down the current year or gearing up for the new year. As we do so, let's take some time out to make sure our businesses are ready for a productive 2017. Here's a list of items to review: (more...)
Also listed in: Marketing

Simple Steps to Dispose of Your Notary Stamp

by American Association of Notaries
Have you retired? Chosen another line of work? Decided not to renew your commission? Whatever the reasons are, you are now in the possession of a notary stamp that is no longer necessary. To protect yourself from liability and to ensure your notary stamp doesn't fall into the wrong hands, you will need to render it useless. (more...)

What is in Your Notary Bag?

by American Association of Notaries
As notaries, we cannot do our jobs without the proper notary supplies. One of the most important tools in our arsenal of notary supplies is the notary stamp. While every state has different requirements for notaries, the notary stamps, seals, notary journals and other notary supplies are pretty standard. (more...)

Six Critical Steps to Follow if a Notary Stamp is Lost

by American Association of Notaries
If you lose your notary seal, will you react like the notary public in today's example? Of course, you won't! Everything that this notary does is wrong. Today, learn from his mistakes and make note of the six critical steps that you must follow when a notarial seal is lost. (more...)

Space too Small for your Notary Stamp?

by American Association of Notaries
Most of us have been in this predicament--a client hands over a document and it is filled to its edges with text. You visually scan the document and see it includes a pre-printed notarial certificate that is barely the size of a business card. Even worse, you note that the area intended for your notary seal would be the perfect size, but only if you were a Notary Ken or Notary Barbie doll! (more...)

Understanding Affidavits

by American Association of Notaries
An affidavit is a sworn or affirmed statement made before a notary public or any public official who has the authority to administer oaths. It is made under penalty of perjury, and the official must administer an oath or affirmation to the signer(s), witness the signing of the document and certify it by placing his official signature and seal and completing the notarial certificate called a jurat. (more...)

Protect Yourself: Report Stolen Notary Seals!

by American Association of Notaries
Have you recently left a job and had your seal or journal held back by your employer? Have you noticed that one or more of your seals is missing? If so, take immediate action to protect yourself. (more...)

The Contents of a Notary Journal

by American Association of Notaries
There are three primary types of notary journals. One has minimal space per entry; one has more generous space per entry but fewer entries per page; and one is designed for notary signing agents and has frequently-seen real estate documents pre-listed in it. Each of these three types can be found in paperback or hardback. Which type you choose is your decision. It is important to see a sample page of the journal before you buy it, as you will be using it for some time. (more...)

Why a Notary Journal Is Required

by American Association of Notaries
Almost no one likes to do paperwork, especially if they don't have to do it. So, if you tell them that paperwork is not required, most people will be happy to believe you and skip it. When it comes to the notary journal, skipping the paperwork is not an option. Keeping a notary journal is required for the following reasons: (more...)

Notary Public Seals or Stamps

by American Association of Notaries
The need for a trusted and impartial witness who can write down commercial and other agreements has been recognized since the time of the ancient Romans, who created the office of notarius or scribii to fulfill this need. If the parties to the agreement could not write, they used a metal or clay disk with a distinctive design or coat of arms (a private seal) pressed into melted wax in place of a signature. In the following centuries, as paper making became more widespread and written agreements became longer, the pages of a document were bound together by making holes in the margins, tying the pages together with a ribbon, and pouring wax over the ribbon's knot. If the document were to be notarized, the notary would press his official seal into the wax, thereby sealing the pages of the document together. (more...)

Four Steps to Follow When Ordering a New Notary Stamp

by American Association of Notaries
A notary stamp is one of the most important tools that a notary public will use in the performance of his or her notarial duties. The official seal of a notary on a document is a recognized mark indicating that: (more...)

Notary Stamp Ink Color: Black or Blue?

by American Association of Notaries
If your state does not address which color ink to use when notarizing documents, ordering a notary stamp with a blue ink color is best. Given the improved quality of copy machines these days, it is difficult to distinguish between originals and copies. A blue ink notary stamp impression usually shows lighter prints than the original print on a black-and-white copier. (more...)

Pre-Inked Notary Stamps vs. Self-Inking Notary Stamps

by American Association of Notaries

The official seal of a notary on a legal document is a recognized mark that the notary is an officer of the state qualified to provide the services being rendered and that the authenticity of the signature on a legal document is being verified. It is important when making an impression of your notary stamp to ensure that all the required information will clearly print on the document that you notarize. Missing or unclear elements of the notary stamp may jeopardize acceptance of the document you notarize, making it questionable and probably invalid. (more...)

Notarizing Previously Signed Documents

by American Association of Notaries
There are times, as a notary, when you will be presented with a document for notarization that has been previously signed. This may occur simply because the signer thinks he is being thorough by filling in all the blanks and signing before he meets with you. At other times, a document may have been signed and submitted to the recipient before the signer was aware that notarization was required and now the document has been returned and the signer requires the services of a notary. (more...)

What If There Is No Room for the Notary Stamp or Notary Seal?

by American Association of Notaries
One of the most important steps in the notarization of any document is the placing of the notary stamp seal. This step, along with the notary's signature, is the culmination of all the preliminary steps in notarizing, such as identity checking, document scanning, and making record book entries. The notary stamp contains all the identifying information of the notary public - name, commission state and county, notary commission number, and commission expiration date. It is essential and mandatory that all of this information be placed neatly and legibly on every document that the notary executes. (more...)

Having Multiple Notary Stamps - A Good Practice

by American Association of Notaries
While there are several states that do not specifically require the use of a notary stamp, most notaries find that a self-inking notary stamp is the easiest, cleanest, and most expeditious means of inscribing the mandated notary commission information onto a notarized document. (more...)
Also listed in: Notary Best Practices

How to Handle Lost or Stolen Notary Supplies

by American Association of Notaries
Notaries are responsible for safeguarding their notary supplies and protecting them from fraudulent use. (more...)

Understanding the Importance of Your Notary Commission Name

by American Association of Notaries
Once you have received your notary commission from the state, you are ready to embark on your new career as a notary public. (more...)

How to Properly Use a Notary Stamp

by American Association of Notaries
Using a self-inking notary stamp is the easiest way to inscribe the notary commission information on a document to be notarized; it is quick, easy, and neat. (more...)

Using Notary Gold Foil Seals on Notarized Documents

by American Association of Notaries
While the self-inking or pre-inked notary stamp is the convenient tool of choice for all notaries when notarizing documents, there are times when a notary may wish to add extra enhancement to the executed document. (more...)

Using a Notary Seal Impression Inker on an Embossed Document

by American Association of Notaries
As a notary, you are not just a public servant, but you are also a professional and, as such, will want to take pride in your work. There are times when you may wish to give an added flair or enhancement to the document you are notarizing. (more...)

Notary Supplies That Every Notary Should Have!

by American Association of Notaries
The notary is a public officer and, as such, is required to comply with any reasonable request for notarization. Whether you are a notary with your own notary signing service or an employee notary, it is a good idea to keep essential notary supplies with you at all times so that you may be ready to adequately and efficiently serve the public upon request. (more...)

Employed Notaries - Your Notary Supplies Belong to the Notary

by American Association of Notaries
An employee notary is a notary who obtained a commission at the request of his or her employer. Perhaps your company transacts with clients, such as banks or insurance companies, that must have documents notarized on a regular basis. (more...)

How to Safeguard Your Notary Supplies

by American Association of Notaries
Notaries are responsible for safeguarding their notary supplies against fraudulent use. These items include the notary's original certificate or commission, the notary stamp and seal, and the notary record book of notarial acts. (more...)

How to Properly Destroy Your Expired Notary Stamps and Supplies

by American Association of Notaries
When a notary reaches the end of the notary commission term or decides to end his or her notary career, all expired and defunct notary supplies must be disposed of safely and properly. (more...)

How to Choose a Bonding and Notary Supplies Company

by American Association of Notaries
It is critical to choose a very reputable notary bonding agency and a notary stamp and notary supplies company that is approved by your state to issue notary bonds and notary supplies. As with any notary insurance, you want an agency you can count on. One that will still be here tomorrow and for years to come. (more...)

AAN Introduces Laser Engraving For Notary Stamps

by American Association of Notaries
In order to bring our members the absolute best in notary stamp and notary seal technology, the American Association of Notaries now provides notary stamps and notary seals made with a state of the art Laser Engraving process. (more...)

Notaries: Maintain a Notary Journal!

by American Association of Notaries
The notary's best defense is the notary record book, or notary journal. Some states require notaries to keep a notary record book and some states do not; however, all notaries are encouraged to keep a journal of every notarial act. (more...)

Texas Notaries Are Forbidden From Recording ID Card Numbers

by American Association of Notaries
As of April 22, 2007 Texas Notaries Public Are Forbidden From Recording Identification Card Numbers in Their Notary Record Books. Section 406.014(a)(5) does not require that the personal information on the identification card be recorded in the notary record book. However, notaries public have recorded the driver's license in their notary record books. (more...)
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Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries seeks to provide timely articles for notaries to assist them with information and ideas for managing their notary businesses, enhancing their notary educations, and securing their notary supplies but makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained . Information in this article is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their state if they have legal questions about how to notarize.
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