How to become a Nevada Notary

Abbreviation: NV | 36th State | Statehood: October 31, 1864 |
How to become a notary in Nevada:
To become a notary in Nevada, a notary applicant must meet all of the following requirements:
  1. Be at least 18 years of age
  2. Be a citizen of the United States or lawfully admitted for permanent residency in the United States
  3. Be a resident of Nevada or a person of a bordering state who is regularly employed or maintains a business in Nevada
  4. Possess his or her civil rights
  5. Never have had a notary commission revoked in this state or in any other state
Qualifications for becoming a notary in Nevada:
In order to become a Nevada notary and receive a Nevada notary public commission, a notary applicant must:
  1. Meet the eligibility requirements provided in the previous section.
  2. Complete a three-hour notary course of study and pass an exam that is now offered online through the Secretary of State’s Notary Division or through an approved vendor.
  3. File a $10,000 surety bond and execute an oath of office with the county clerk of the county in which the applicant resides.
  4. The county clerk will issue a “Filing Notice” after the filing of the bond and oath.
  5. Submit to the Secretary of State’s Notary Division: (1) a completed “Application for Appointment as Notary Public,” (2) the Filing Notice, (3) a $35 filing fee, and (4) the notary training certificate.
  6. Non-residents must: (1) satisfy the same qualifications as Nevada residents, (2) follow the same notary application process and procedures above, (3) submit the required affidavits, and (4) provide a copy of the Nevada State Business License of their employer.
  7. The Secretary of State may require the applicant to submit a complete set of his or her fingerprints and a written permission authorizing the Secretary of State to submit those forms to state or federal authorities. The applicant is responsible for fees associated with processing the fingerprints.
  8. The Secretary of State will issue a Certificate of Appointment upon approval of the notary application, which is required to purchase the official stamp.
  9.  

    To download the required forms, visit the Secretary of State at http://nvsos.gov/sos/licensing/notary/forms-fees or click here.

Can a non-resident become a notary in Nevada?
Yes. An individual in a state bordering Nevada, whose place of work or business is in Nevada, may apply to become a Nevada notary public for a one-year term. The qualifying bordering states include California, Oregon, Utah, Idaho, and Arizona. Non-residents must: (1) satisfy the same qualifications as Nevada residents and (2) follow the same notary application process and procedures as Nevada residents. In addition, non-residents must submit with their notary application (1) a “Non-Resident Notary Public Affidavit,” (2) an “Affidavit of Applicant’s Employer” completed by their employer, (3) an “Affidavit of Self-Employed Applicant” if the non-resident is self-employed, and (4) a copy of the Nevada State Business license from the company in which he or she is employed. If the non-resident notary public ceases to maintain a place of business in Nevada or regular employment at an office, business, or facility located within Nevada, the Secretary of State may suspend the notary’s appointment. Download the forms at http://nvsos.gov/sos/licensing/notary/forms-fees or click here.

 

Is a Nevada notary bond required to become a notary in Nevada?
Yes. A Nevada notary bond in the amount of $10,000 is required for new and renewing notaries public.

 

Nevada notary errors and omissions insurance:
Optional. Errors and omission insurance is designed to protect notaries public from liability against unintentional notarial mistakes or omissions that result in financial damages to the public or a document signer. The American Association of Notaries encourages Nevada notaries to purchase an errors and omissions insurance policy for their protection against liability.

 

How much does it cost to become a notary in Nevada?
When becoming a notary public in Nevada, an applicant will incur the following expenses: (1) a $35 filing fee to process his or her application for appointment or reappointment, (2) a notary stamp, (3) a surety bond, (4) a journal, and (5) the notary course of study and exam.

 

How long is the term of a notary public commission in Nevada?
The term of office of a Nevada notary public is for four years commencing with the date specified in the commission. However, a notary’s commission may be rendered void by: (1) resignation, (2) death, (3) revocation, or (4) termination of employment or ceasing to maintain a business in Nevada.

 

Where can I perform notarial acts in Nevada?
A Nevada notary public has statewide jurisdiction and may perform notarial acts in any county at any location in Nevada. Likewise, a Nevada notary may not perform notarial acts outside this state.

 

Who appoints Nevada notaries public?
The Secretary of State appoints Nevada notaries public.

 

Contact the Secretary of State at:

 

Nevada Secretary of State
Notary Division
101 North Carson Street, Suite 3
Carson City, Nevada 89710-3714
(775) 684-5708
http://nvsos.gov/sos/licensing/notary

 

How to renew your Nevada notary commission:
Nevada notaries must re-take the three-hour notary course of study and pass an exam (both are offered online through the Secretary of State’s Notary Division), submit the application for reappointment, and follow the initial application for appointment procedures—all before the expiration of the notary’s commission.

 

Are there any exams or notary course requirements to become a notary or renew your Nevada notary commission?
Yes. All notary applicants are required to complete a three-hour notary course of studyand pass a mandatory exam, both of which are now being offered online through the Secretary of State’s Notary Division. An applicant also has the option to obtain the mandatory notary course of study and exam through a vendor approved by the Secretary of State. Nevada notaries renewing their notary commission must retake the notary course of study and pass an exam prior to submitting their application for reappointment.

 

Do I need to purchase a notary stamp in Nevada?
Yes. Nevada law requires all notaries public to use a rectangular rubber-inked stamp or other mechanical stamp to authenticate all notarial acts. Section 240.040 of the Nevada Revised Statutes provides the legal specifications regarding the layout and the information required on a notary stamp.

 

Notary Stamp Requirements:

 

The notary stamp must be no more than 1” in width by 2 ½” in length with a border design, produce a legible imprint, and contain the following elements:

  • The name of the notary public
  • The words “Notary Public
  • The words “State of Nevada"
  • The date on which the appointment of the notary public expires
  • The number of the certificate of appointment of the notary public
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    In addition, Nevada notaries may add to their notary stamp the words “Great Seal of the State of Nevada.”Every non-resident notary must include in their notary stamp the word “Nonresident.” A mechanical stamp includes an imprint made by a computer or other similar technology.

     

    Note: A notary public shall not affix his or her notary stamp over printed material. Every notary public shall keep his or her notary stamp in a locked and secured area when not in use.

     

    Is a notary journal required in Nevada?
    Yes. Nevada notary law requires all Nevada notaries to record every notarial act in a bound volume journal with preprinted page numbers. Nevada notaries are required keep their journal for seven years after they are no longer notaries public. The journal must be kept in a locked and secured area, under the direct and exclusive control of the notary. If a journal is lost or stolen, a notary is required to file a report with the Secretary of State and the appropriate law enforcement agency. For Nevada notary supplies, visit the American Association of Notaries website at www.usnotaries.com or call (800) 721-2663 or click here.

     

    How much can a Nevada notary charge for performing notarial acts?
    Nevada notary fees are set by statute (§240.100). The maximum allowable fees that a Nevada notary public can charge for notarial acts are listed below:
  • Taking an acknowledgment (for the first signature of each signer) - $5.00
  • For each additional signature - $2.50
  • Administering an oath or affirmation - $5.00
  • Administering an oath or affirmation (without a signature) - $2.50
  • Jurat, for each signature on the affidavit - $5.00
  • Certified copy - $2.50
  • Performing a marriage ceremony - $75
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    Travel fees may be charged if the client agrees in advance upon an hourly rate. The maximum hourly rate for travel that a notary public may charge to perform a notarial act between 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. is $10per hour or $25 per hour for travel between 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. If Nevada notaries charge fees for notarial acts, they must post a table of fees in some conspicuous place in their office, and the print must not be smaller than ½ inch type. Without such a posting, Nevada notaries may not charge a fee for their notarial acts.

     

    What notarial acts can a Nevada notary public perform?
    A Nevada notary public is authorized to perform seven notarial acts:
  • Taking acknowledgments
  • Administering oaths or affirmations
  • Executing jurats
  • Taking verification upon oaths or affirmations
  • Witnessing or attesting a signature
  • Noting protests of negotiable instruments (only certain notary employees of depository institutions)
  • Certifying or attesting a copy
  • Performing such other duties as may be prescribed by a specific statute
  • Performing marriages (only notaries with certificate of permission from a county clerk)
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    Can I perform electronic notarizations in Nevada?
    Yes. The State of Nevada enacted the Electronic Notary Public Authorization Act, NRS 240.181 through 240.206, which authorizes electronic notaries public to perform notarial acts for electronic documents. To qualify for an appointment as an Electronic Notary Public, the applicant must be a Nevada notary public at least four years prior to applying to become an electronic notary public. Electronic notaries must satisfy the same qualifications as a Nevada notary public by following the same notary application process and procedures. The mandatory course of study that electronic notaries are required to take pertains to electronic notarial acts. Most importantly, Nevada statutes mandate that the document signer must personally appear before the notary public physically close enough to see, hear, communicate, and give identification credentials to each other without reliance on an electronic device such as a telephone, computer, video camera, Skype, or facsimile machine at the time of the performance of the notarial act. Therefore, Nevada notaries public are prohibited from performing online webcam notarizations, which are illegal in Nevada.

     

    How do I change my address?
    A Nevada notary must notify the Secretary of State on a prescribed form, within thirty days, of any changes in his or her mailing address, county of residence, or signature. If the notary public is a resident of an adjoining state and changes his or her place of business or employment, the non-resident notary must submit to the Secretary of State a request for an amended certificate of appointment on a form provided by the Secretary of State and pay a $10 fee to file this form. Failure to notify the Secretary of State of an address change within the thirty-day period may result in the suspension of the notary’s certificate of appointment by the Secretary of State. For every amended certificate of appointment, a notary public is required to obtain a new notary stamp that reflects the new information. To download the Amendment of Notary Public Appointment/Information form, visit the Secretary of State at http://nvsos.gov/sos/licensing/notary/forms-fees or click here.

     

    How do I change my name on my notary commission in Nevada?
    Optional. A Nevada notary, who wishes to continue using the same name on file with the Secretary of State, is not required to submit a name change form. However, a notary public who wishes to notarize documents under his or her new name is required to send an Amended Certificate of Appointment form along with a $10fee to the Secretary of State within thirty days of such name change. The surety company that issued the bond must also be notified of the name change. The Nevada notary must purchase a new notary seal that imprints the new name after the Secretary of State issues the amended certificate of appointment. To download the Amendment of Notary Public Appointment/Information form, visit the Secretary of State at http://nvsos.gov/sos/licensing/notary/forms-fees or click here.

     

    Death/Resignation/Removal:
    A Nevada notary public or the executor of the estate of the notary public is required to send a signed letter to the Secretary of State if the notary: (1) no longer maintains a residence in Nevada during the term of appointment; (2) no longer wishes to hold the office of notary public; (3) is deceased; or (4) is duty-bound to resign by court order or the Secretary of State’s revocation process. A notary or the executor of the estate of the notary public must immediately destroy the notary’s official seal.

     

    Prohibited Notarial Acts:
    The following acts are unacceptable conduct for a notary and provide a basis for administrative disciplinary action:
  • Influencing a person to enter or not enter into a lawful transaction
  • Using the term “notario,” “notario publico,” “licenciado,” or any other equivalent non-English term to advertise notary services
  • Submitting a notary application that contains a substantial and material misstatement or omission of fact
  • Certifying an instrument containing a statement known to the notary to be false
  • Performing a notarial act with intent to deceive or defraud
  • Altering a notary journal with the intent to deceive or defraud
  • Endorsing or promoting any product using his or her title as a notary
  • Allowing any other person to use his or her notary seal
  • Allowing any other person to sign his or her name in a notarial capacity
  • Performing a notarial act on a document that contains only a signature
  • Notarizing a document when either the notary or notary’s spouse or domestic partner has a direct beneficial interest in the document
  • Notarizing for a document signer who has not provided satisfactory evidence of identity
  • Notarizing a document that did not contain a notarial certificate
  • Notarizing a document that contains blank spaces
  • Notarizing a document when the notary public was named in the document
  • Notarizing for a relative or relatives of the notary’s domestic partner by marriage or consanguinity
  • Notarizing a document without the signer being in the notary’s presence at the time of the performance of the notarial act
  • Notarizing his or her own signature
  • Signing a notarial certificate under any other name than the one under which he or she was commissioned
  • Performing notarial acts without having a current certificate of appointment
  • Certifying photocopies of documents recordable in the public records
  • Performing a marriage ceremony without having a valid certification to perform marriages
  • Charging more than the fee prescribed by law for notarial services
  • Overcharging for performing a marriage ceremony
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    Official Notarial Misconduct:
    Nevada notaries public who commit official misconduct may be subject to criminal liability, civil liability, disciplinary action, and other official measures for the following situations:

     

    NRS 240.085—Advertisements in a language other than English must contain notice if a notary public is not an attorney. If a notary public is guilty of violating the provisions of subsection 1 or 2, the Secretary of State shall: (1) suspend the appointment of the notary public for not less than one year; (2) revoke the appointment of the notary public for a third or subsequent offense; and (3) assess a civil penalty of not more than $2,000 for each violation. A notary public who is found guilty in a criminal prosecution of violating subsection 1 or 2 shall be punished by a fine of not more than $2,000.

     

    NRS 240.145—Unlawful reproduction or use of a completed notarial certificate with a notary’s statement and signature if that certificate is used to endorse, promote, sell, and produce services. Any person who violates any of the provisions of subsection 1 is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

     

    NRS 240.147—Unlawful destruction, defacement, or concealment of a notarial record. It is unlawful for a person to knowingly destroy, deface, or conceal a notarial record.

     

    NRS 240.150—Liability for misconduct or neglect; liability of employer; penalties for willful violation or neglect of duty. The employer of a notary public may be assessed a civil penalty by the Secretary of State of not more than $2,000 for each violation specified in subsection 4 committed by the notary public, and the employer is liable for any damages proximately caused by the misconduct of the notary public if: (1) the notary public was acting within the scope of his or her employment at the time the notary public engaged in the misconduct; and (2) the employer of the notary public consented to the misconduct of the notary public.

     

    For any willful violation or neglect of duty or other violation of this chapter, or upon proof that a notary public has been convicted of, or entered a plea of guilty to, a crime described in paragraph (c) of subsection 2 of NRS 240.010: (a) the appointment of the notary public may be suspended for a period determined by the Secretary of State, but not exceeding the time remaining on the appointment; (b) the appointment of the notary public may be revoked after a hearing; or (c) the notary public may be assessed a civil penalty of not more than $2,000 for each violation.

     

    NRS 240.155—Notarization of the signature of a person not in the presence of a notary public is unlawful and carries a penalty. A person who: (a) violates the provisions of subsection 1; or (b) aids and abets a notary public to commit a violation of subsection 1 is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

     

    Nevada Laws and Regulations:
    Nevada Revised Statutes, Chapter 240, “Notaries Public and Commissioned Abstracters,” which contains the “Uniform Law on Notarial Acts” and “Electronic Notary Public Authorization Act”
    https://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-240.html

     

    Nevada Revised Statutes, Chapter 111, “Estates in Property; Conveyancing and Recording”
    https://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-111.html

     

    Chapter 122, “Marriage”
    https://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-122.html

     

    Nevada Administrative Code, Chapter 240, “Notaries Public”
    https://www.leg.state.nv.us/NAC/NAC-240.html

     

    Notarial Certificates:
    Click here to view Nevada’s notarial certificates.

    Revised: December 2017

    Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this page. Information this page is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their state if they have legal questions about how to notarize.
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