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How to Become a Nevada Notary


The Nevada Notary Process:


Are you interested in becoming a Nevada notary? Are you interested in generating extra income, starting your own Nevada notary business, adding a notary title to your resume, or helping people in your community? The State of Nevada appoints notaries to serve the public as unbiased impartial witnesses to document signing. Becoming a notary in Nevada is a straightforward process, and as long as you meet the eligibility requirements listed below, you can apply to become a Nevada notary. The American Association of Notaries has been helping individuals become notaries since 1994.

 

This guide will help you understand:

  1. Who can become a Nevada notary
  2. The process to become a Nevada notary
  3. Basic Nevada notary duties

What are the qualifications to become a Nevada notary?


To become a Nevada notary public, a notary applicant must meet the following requirements:

 

  1. Be at least 18 years of age.
  2. Be a resident of Nevada or be a resident of a bordering state who is regularly employed or maintains a place of business in Nevada.
  3. Never have had a notary commission revoked in another state.
  4. Possess his or her civil rights.
  5. Have completed a course of study pursuant to NRS 240.018.

 

Note: To qualify as a resident of Nevada for appointment as a notary public, the applicant must have been “actually, physically and corporeally present in this state with the intent to establish permanent habitation for at least thirty days before the date on which he or she submitted his or her application. A notary public must maintain residency in this state during the term of his or her appointment” (NAC 240.260).

What is the process to become a Nevada notary?


In order to become a Nevada notary and receive a Nevada notary commission, a notary applicant must:

 

  1. Meet the eligibility requirements provided in the previous section.
  2. Complete a three-hour online notary training class and pass an exam through the Secretary of State’s Notary Division.
  3. File a $10,000 surety bond with the county clerk in his or her county of residence or employment.
  4. Take an oath of office administered by the county clerk. (The county clerk will issue a “Filing Notice” after the filing of the bond and oath.) Submit an online notary application through the online Silver Flume portal. (The online application process requires the applicant to: (1) sign in blue ink; (2) upload the original filing notice from the county clerk; (3) submit the $35 application fee; and (4) submit the $45 training fee.

 

The Secretary of State then issues a Certificate of Appointment upon approval.

 

Note: The Secretary of State may require an applicant to submit a complete set of his or her fingerprints and written permission to forward the fingerprints to the Central Repository for Nevada Records of Criminal History for submission to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for its report. If fingerprints are required, the applicant must also submit the fees charged for processing the fingerprints.

Can a non-resident become a notary in Nevada?

Yes. A resident of a state bordering Nevada who is regularly employed or maintains a place of business in Nevada may apply to become a Nevada notary public (NRS 240.015[3]. A nonresident must:

 

  1. Satisfy the same qualifications as Nevada residents.
  2. Follow the same application procedures as Nevada residents.
  3. Submit these affidavits: (a) a “Non-Resident Notary Public Affidavit,” (b) an “Affidavit of Applicant’s Employer” completed by their employer; or (c) an “Affidavit of Self-Employed Applicant” if the non-resident is self-employed.
  4. Provide a copy of the Nevada State Business License of the applicant’s employer or a copy of any business license required by local government where the business is located if the applicant is self-employed.

 

If a nonresident notary ceases to be regularly employed or maintain a place of business in Nevada, the Secretary of State may suspend the notary’s appointment. The Secretary of State may reinstate an appointment suspended if the nonresident notary submits to the Secretary of State the required information before the notary’s commission expires. Nonresident notaries must submit to the Secretary of State annually, within 30 days before the anniversary date of their appointment as a notary public, a copy of their employer’s state business license or a copy of any license required by the local government where their business is located if self-employed (NRS 240.031). The only states that qualify as a bordering state are California, Oregon, Utah, Idaho, and Arizona.

How much does it cost to become a notary in Nevada?

A Nevada notary applicant’s expenses include: (1) a $35 application fee to process an application for appointment or reappointment; (2) a $45 notary training class and exam; (3) a surety bond; (4) a journal to record all notarial acts; (5) a notary seal; and (6) an E&O insurance policy if a notary wishes to obtain one for his or her own personal legal and financial protection.

How do I renew my Nevada notary commission?

Nevada notaries are required once more to successfully complete a three-hour notary training class and pass an exam (NRS 240.018[3][b]). Before his or her commission expiration date, a Nevada notary must apply for reappointment and follow the same procedures as for the initial application for appointment.

Are there any exams or notary courses required to become a Nevada notary public or to renew my Nevada notary public commission?

Yes. All new applicants for appointment as notary public and renewing notaries are required to successfully complete a three-hour notary course of study and pass an examination relating to the functions and duties of notaries public (NRS 240.018). The mandatory course of study and examination may be conducted in person or online by the Secretary of State’s Notary Division or a vendor approved by the Secretary of State. After successfully completing the mandatory course and examination, an applicant must include with his or her application of appointment as notary public a certificate of successful completion of a notary course that contains a validation stamp from the Secretary of State, which is valid for ninety days after the date of its issuance. The three-hour online notary training class and exam provided by the Secretary of State’s Notary Division is $45. A notary public who registers with the Secretary of State as an electronic notary for the first time must successfully complete an additional course of study on electronic notarizations before filing his or her registration. A certificate of successful completion for the mandatory training relating to electronic notarizations must also be included in the registration process, which is valid for ninety days after the date of its issuance.

Can I perform electronic notarization in Nevada?

Yes. The State of Nevada enacted the Electronic Notary Public Authorization Act (“Electronic Notarization Enabling Act”) (NRS 240.181 through 240.206), allowing electronic notaries to obtain an electronic signature and electronic seal to notarize electronic documents in the physical presence of the individual seeking the notarization like a traditional/pen and paper notarization. Before a notary public performs the notary’s initial electronic notarization, the notary must register with the Secretary of State as an electronic notary to perform electronic notarizations.

Can I perform remote (online) notarizations in Nevada?

Yes. Effective July 1, 2018, the Electronic Notarization Enabling Act allows Nevada notaries to perform electronic notarizations using a Secretary of State approved audio-video communication technology (NRS 240.181 through 240.206). Before a Nevada notary public performs the initial electronic notarization by means of audio-video communication, the notary must first successfully complete an additional three-hour course of study on electronic notarization and pass the examination before filing a registration with the Secretary of State to register as an electronic notary.

 

To be eligible to perform electronic notarizations, a Nevada notary must:

 

  1. Sign-in to an existing account at the Silver Flume portal.
  2. Submit the electronic notary training course registration with a $45 fee.
  3. Submit the online registration with a $50 fee.
  4. Complete the electronic notary training course and pass the exam.
  5. Obtain an electronic signature and seal from an approved eNotary technology solution provider.
  6. Upload a PDF file containing the electronic signature and seal to complete registration.
  7. Provide a description of the audio-video communication technology that the notary intends to use to perform electronic notarial acts.
  8. Provide all the required information.

 

Once the registration is approved, an e-notary must comply with all the requirements and duties set forth in the Electronic Notarization Enabling Act. The electronic notary registration runs concurrently with the traditional notary commission.

 

Moreover, when performing an electronic notarization by means of audio-video communication, an e-notary shall comply with the legal notarial requirements including: (1) the audio-video communication technology used must allow the persons communicating to see and speak to each other simultaneously; (2) the signal transmission must be in real time; (3) the e-notary must be physically located in Nevada, even though the principal may be geographically located in any state or country but visually in the presence of the e-notary through the use of audio-visual communication; (4) the principal’s identity must be established based on satisfactory evidence of identity; (5) the e-notary completes a notarial certificate that includes that the notarial act was performed remotely; (6) the e-notary records the remote notarization in a journal; and (7) the e-notary retains an audio recording of the remote notarization.

How long is the term of a notary public commission in Nevada?

The commission term of a Nevada notary public is four years commencing with the date of appointment. However, a notary’s commission may be rendered void by resignation, death, or revocation. The commission may also be rendered void when a notary ceases to reside in Nevada or when a nonresident notary ceases to be regularly employed or maintain a place of business in Nevada.

Is a Nevada notary bond required to become a notary in Nevada?

Yes. A surety bond in the amount of $10,000 is required for all new applicants seeking appointments as notaries public and for renewing notaries in Nevada. The surety bond must be issued by a surety company qualified and authorized to do business in Nevada. Before submitting an online application for appointment as a notary public, an applicant must file a $10,000 surety bond with the county clerk of his or her county of residence or, if the applicant is a resident of a bordering state, with the county clerk of the county in which the applicant maintains a place of business or is regularly employed.

Do I need a Nevada notary errors and omission insurance?

A notary errors and omissions insurance policy is optional in Nevada. The American Association of Notaries strongly recommends that Nevada notaries public obtain errors and omissions insurance policies for their personal protection against liability. Errors and omission insurance is designed to protect notaries public from liability against unintentional notarial mistakes or omissions that result in financial damages to the public or a document signer. An E&O policy customarily covers legal fees and damages based on the coverage a Nevada notary public selects.

Where can I perform notarial acts in Nevada?

Nevada notaries have statewide jurisdiction, and they must be physically within the geographic borders of the state of Nevada. Likewise, Nevada notaries public may not perform notarial acts outside of Nevada.

Who appoints Nevada notaries public?

The Secretary of State processes notary applications, issues notary commissions, maintains all records regarding notaries, and processes registrations for electronic notaries. To contact the Secretary of State, use the following information:

 

Nevada Secretary of State
Notary Division
101 North Carson Street, Suite 3
Carson City, Nevada 89701-3714
(775) 684-5708
https://www.nvsos.gov/sos/licensing/notary

Do I need to purchase a notary stamp in Nevada?

Yes. Nevada notary law requires all Nevada notaries to use an official stamp that is imprinted in indelible, photographically reproducible ink with a rubber or other mechanical stamp to authenticate all notarial acts (NRS 240.040). Section 240.040 of the Nevada Revised Statutes provides the legal specifications regarding the layout and the information required on a notary stamp.

 

Dimensions: The notary stamp must be a rectangle, not larger than 1 inch by 2 ½ inches and produce a legible imprint. It may contain a border design.

 

Required Elements: The notary stamp must contain the following components:

 

  • The name of the notary public
  • The phrase “Notary Public, State of Nevada”
  • The date on which the appointment of the notary public expires
  • The number of the certificate of appointment of the notary public
  • If the notary public so desires, the Great Seal of the State of Nevada
  • If the notary public is a resident of an adjoining state, the word “nonresident”

 

A mechanical stamp includes an imprint made by a computer or other similar technology (NRS 240.040[6]). Nevada notaries are prohibited from affixing their notary stamps over printed material. A notary is required to immediately notify the Secretary of State if his or her notary stamp is lost, destroyed, broken, damaged, or otherwise inoperable. An electronic notary may use an electronic signature and electronic seal only for the performing electronic notarial acts.

Is a notary journal required in Nevada?

Yes. Each notary public is required to maintain a journal and record each notarial act performed in a bound volume journal with preprinted page numbers (NRS 240.120). A Nevada notary must retain his or her journal(s) for seven years after the date on which he or she ceases to be a notary public. The notary’s journal must be kept in a locked and secured area, under the direct and exclusive control of the notary. If a journal is lost or stolen, a Nevada notary is required to file a report with the Secretary of State and the appropriate law enforcement agency. An electronic notary public must keep an electronic journal of each electronic notarial act performed. An electronic journal must: (a) enable access by a password or other secure means of authentication; and (b) be capable of providing tangible or electronic copies of any entry made therein (NRS 240.201). An e-notary must retain his or her electronic journal for seven years after the termination of the registration of the electronic notary. For Nevada notary supplies, visit the American Association of Notaries website at www.usnotaries.com or call 800.721.2663.

 

 

How much can a Nevada notary charge for performing notarial acts?

Nevada notary fees are set by statute (NRS 240.100). The maximum allowable fees that a Nevada notary public can charge for notarial acts are listed below:

 

  • Taking an acknowledgment (for the first signature of each signer) - $5.00
  • For each additional signer - $2.50
  • For a jurat, for each signature on the affidavit - $5.00
  • For administering an oath or affirmation without a signature - $2.50
  • For a jurat, for each signature on the affidavit - $5.00
  • For a certified copy - $2.50
  • Performing a marriage ceremony - $75

 

A Nevada notary may charge a separate travel fee as agreed to by the notary and the client prior to the notarial act. The maximum hourly rate for travel that a notary public may charge to perform a notarial act between 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. is $10per hour. The maximum hourly rate for travel that a notary public may charge to perform a notarial act between 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. is $25 per hour. The notary may charge a minimum of two hours for travel for such travel and must charge on a pro rata basis after the first two hours. If Nevada notaries charge fees for notarial acts, they must post a table of fees in some conspicuous place in their office, and the print must not be smaller than 1/2 inch type. Without such a posting, Nevada notaries may not charge a fee for their notarial acts. An electronic notary public may charge $25 for each electronic notarial act performed (NRS 240.197). An electronic notary may charge an additional fee for traveling to perform an electronic notarial act.

What notarial acts can a Nevada notary public perform?

A Nevada notary public is authorized to perform the following notarial acts (NRS 240.004):

 

  • Taking an acknowledgment
  • Administering an oath or affirmation
  • Executing a jurat
  • Noting a protest of a negotiable instrument
  • Certifying a copy
  • Performing such other duties as may be prescribed by a specific statute
  • Performing marriages (only notaries with certificate of permission from a county clerk)

How do I update my address for my Nevada notary commission?

A Nevada notary public that has any changes in his or her mailing address, county of residence, or signature—or a nonresident notary that has any changes in his or her place of business or employment—must submit a request for an amended certificate of appointment to the Secretary of State on a prescribed form within thirty days of such change with a $10 filing fee. Failure to submit the request for an amended certificate of appointment to the Secretary of State within the thirty-day period may result in the suspension of a notary’s commission. For every amended certificate of appointment, a Nevada notary is required to obtain a new notary stamp that reflects the new information. To download the Amendment of Notary Public Appointment/Information form, visit the Secretary of State website at https://www.nvsos.gov/sos/licensing/notary/forms-fees.

Do I have to change my name on my notary commission in Nevada?

If a notary public changes his or her name during the notary’s appointment term and the notary intends to use his or her new name in the performance of notarial acts, the notary must submit to the Secretary of State a request for an amended certificate of appointment on a prescribed form within thirty days of the name change. The notary’s request must include the notary’s new name, signature, and his or her address with a $10 filing fee. When the Nevada notary receives the amended certificate of appointment from the Secretary of State, the notary must destroy the old notary stamp and obtain a new notary stamp with the new information. Moreover, the notary public must notify the surety company that issued his or her bond of the name change. To download the Amendment of Notary Public Appointment/Information form, visit the Secretary of State website at https://www.nvsos.gov/sos/licensing/notary/forms-fees.

Nevada notarial certificates:

Click here to view Nevada’s notarial certificates.

 

Revised: September 2019

Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this page. Information this page is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their state if they have legal questions about how to notarize.

Notary bonds and errors and omissions insurance policies provided by this insurance agency, American Association of Notaries, Inc., are underwritten by Western Surety Company, Universal Surety of America, or Surety Bonding Company of America, which are subsidiaries of CNA Surety.