How to become a Connecticut Notary

Abbreviation: CT   |   5th State   |   Statehood: January 9, 1788 |
How to become a notary in Connecticut:
To become a notary in Connecticut, a notary applicant must meet all of the following requirements:
  1. Be 18 years of age or older
  2. Be a resident of the state of Connecticut or have a principal place of business in the state
 
Qualifications for becoming a notary in Connecticut:
In order to become a Connecticut notary and receive a ConnecticutCertificate of Appointment, a notary applicant must:
  1. Meet the eligibility requirements provided in the previous section.
  2. Complete an Application for Appointment as a Notary Public form, which the applicant must complete in the applicant’s own handwriting.
  3. Take the written examination that is part of the application for appointment and pass the exam with a 100% score.
  4. Have the Certificate of Character that is part of the application completed and signed by a public official or a reputable business or professional person who is unrelated to the applicant and has personally known the applicant for at least one year.
  5. Have the application of appointment notarized.
  6. Submit the completed and notarized application for appointment with all of the above-referenced requirements with a filing fee of $120.
  7. Take an oath of office upon receiving the Certificate of Appointment issued by the Secretary of State.
  8. Record the Certificate of Appointment and oath of office with the town clerk in the town in which the notary resides within thirty days of receiving the appointment.

     

    To download the application for appointment form, visit the Secretary of State website at http://portal.ct.gov/SOTS/Legislative-Services/Legislation-Administration#notary or click here.

     

    Note: The Secretary of the State may deny an appointment or renewal of appointment to any individual who has been convicted of a felony or a crime of moral turpitude or dishonesty, who has had a previous commission revoked, or who has engaged in some form of notarial misconduct. Such actions could indicate that the individual will have difficulty meeting the high standard of honesty and integrity that all notaries public must maintain.

 
Can a non-resident become a notary in Connecticut?
Yes. A non-resident can become a Connecticut notary public if the person (1) meets the same qualifications as a Connecticut resident; (2) maintains his or her principal place of business in the state of Connecticut; and (3) records his or her oath of office and certificate of appointment with the town clerk of the town in which the place of business is located within thirty days of receiving the certificate.
 
Is a Connecticut notary bond required to become a notary in Connecticut?
No. A Connecticut notary public does not have to be bonded in Connecticut pursuant to the Connecticut notary statute.
 
Do I need a Connecticut notary errors and omissions insurance policy?
Optional. Errors and omission insurance is designed to protect notaries public from liability against unintentional notarial mistakes or omissions that result in financial damages to the public or a document signer. The American Association of Notaries encourages Connecticut notaries to purchase an errors and omissions insurance policy for their protection against liability.
 
How much does it cost to become a notary in Connecticut?
To become a notary public in Connecticut, a notary applicant’s required expenses include the following: (1) a $120 filing fee to process an application for appointment or a $60 filing fee to process an application for reappointment; and (2) a $10 filing fee to record the notary’s oath of office and certificate of appointment with the town clerk. Based on the notary’s wishes, additional expenses may include the purchase of: (1) a surety bond; (2) a notary seal to authenticate all notarial acts; (3) a journal to record all notarial acts performed; and (4) an errors and omissions insurance policy for the notary’s protection against liability.
 
How long is the term of a notary public commission in Connecticut?
The term of office of a Connecticut notary public is five years, commencing on the date specified in the Certificate of Appointment. However, a notary’s certificate of appointment may be rendered void: (1) by resignation; (2) by death; (3) by revocation; or (4) when the notary public ceases to reside in Connecticut or have a principal place of business in this state.
 
Where can I perform notarial acts in Connecticut?
A Connecticut notary has statewide jurisdiction and may perform notarial acts in any county at any location in Connecticut. Likewise, a Connecticut notary public may not perform notarial acts outside this state.
 
Who appoints Connecticut notaries public?
The Connecticut Secretary of State appoints Connecticut notaries public.

 

Contact information for the Secretary of State is as follows:

 

Connecticut Secretary of State
Legislation Administration
Notary Public Unit
PO Box 150470
Hartford, CT 06115-0470
(860) 509-6232
http://portal.ct.gov/SOTS/Legislative-Services/Legislation-Administration

 
How to renew your Connecticut certificate of appointment:
A Connecticut notary public may re-apply for a new certificate of appointment three months prior to the expiration date of a notary public appointment. An application for renewal is mailed to each notary to his/her last reported residence address on record with the Secretary of the State. If an applicant wishes to continue being a notary public, the application for renewal of appointment must be completed in full and returned to the Secretary of State with the nonrefundable statutory application fee of $60.00. The notary must record his or her oath of office and new certificate of appointment with the town clerk in the town in which the notary resides within thirty days of receiving the appointment.
 
Are there any exams or notary course requirements to become a notary or renew your Connecticut certificate of appointment?
Yes. All applicants for a Connecticut Certificate of Appointment are required to complete and pass (with a 100% score)the written examination that is part of the notary public application form. All questions on the written examination must be answered correctly before an applicant is appointed as a notary public. The questions may vary in each application for appointment or reappointment, but each version of the written examination is intended to be a comprehensive test of the applicant's knowledge and ability to perform his/her duties and responsibilities as a notary public.
 
Do I need to purchase a notary stamp in Connecticut?
No. The Connecticut notary statute does not require Connecticut notaries public to authenticate all notarial acts performed with an official seal of office. The use of a notary seal is optional. If a notary public opts to use an official notarial seal, the notary’s inked stamp or embosser should contain the following elements:
  • The notary’s commission name
  • The words “Notary Public”
  • The words “Connecticut”
  • The words “My commission expires (commission expiration date)”
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    Is a notary journal required in Connecticut?
    No. Connecticut law does not require a Connecticut notary public to record every notarial act performed in a journal. However, the Secretary of State and the American Association of Notaries strongly recommend that Connecticut notaries record their notarial acts in a permanent, paper-bound journal with numbered pages designed to deter fraud as a protective measure against liability. For Connecticut notary supplies, visit our website at www.usnotaries.com, call (800) 721-2663, or click here.
     
    How much may a Connecticut notary charge for performing notarial acts?
    Connecticut notary fees are set by statute (§3-95). The maximum allowable fees that a Connecticut notary public may charge for notarial acts are listed below:
  • Acknowledgments - $5.00
  • Oaths or affirmations - $5.00
  • Jurats - $5.00
  • Depositions - $5.00
  • Copy certifications - $5.00
  • Protests - $5.00
  •  

    Note: A notary public may charge $0.35 for each mile of travel to perform a notarial act.

     
    What notarial acts can a Connecticut notary public perform?
    A Connecticut notary public is authorized to perform these notarial acts:
  • Take acknowledgments
  • Administer oaths or affirmations
  • Perform jurats
  • Take depositions and issue subpoenas for depositions in civil actions and probate proceedings
  • Copy certification of some documents
  • Execute protests
  • Can I perform electronic notarizations in Connecticut?
    Yes. The state of Connecticut has not yet adopted statutes or regulations that establish rules, guidelines, standards, and procedures for electronic notarization. However, Connecticut has adopted the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act, including the provision on notarization and acknowledgment, which authorizes electronic signatures used by Connecticut notaries. Section 1-276 states, “If a law requires a signature or record to be notarized, acknowledged, verified or made under oath, the requirement is satisfied if the electronic signature of the person authorized to perform such acts, together with all other information required to be included by other applicable law, is attached to or logically associated with the signature or record.” Connecticut has also adopted the Uniform Real Property Electronic Recording Act that authorizes electronic signatures used by Connecticut notaries public. Most importantly, the Connecticut General Statutes require that a document signer personally appear before a notary public and be physically close enough to see, hear, communicate, and give identification credentials without the use of electronic devices such as telephones, computers, video cameras, or video conferences during the entire performance of the notarial act. Therefore, Connecticut notaries public are prohibited from performing online webcam notarizations. Additionally, Connecticut notaries do not have the authority to notarize within the state when the signer is out of state.
     
    How do I change my address?
    Connecticut notaries whose residences change during their term of appointment are required to report the address change to the Secretary of State within thirty days. Nonresident notaries must maintain a principal place of business in Connecticut and must also report any change in their business address, as well as changes in residence address. These Connecticut notaries are required to submit the completed Notary Public Change of Address Form to the Secretary of State with a filing fee of $15. When the form has been processed, a new certificate of appointment will be issued. It is not necessary for the notary public to take an oath office upon receiving a replacement certificate, but if the notary has relocated his or her residence or principal place of business to a new town, the replacement certificate must be recorded with the town clerk in the new town of residence.To download this form, visit the Secretary of State website at http://portal.ct.gov/SOTS/Legislative-Services/Notary-Public-Forms or click here.
     
    How do I change my name on my notary commission in Connecticut?
    When a Connecticut notary public lawfully changes his or her name during the term of the notary’s appointment, the notary is required tosubmit a completed Notary Public Change of Name Form to the Secretary of State with a filing fee of $15 within thirty days of such a change. The notice shall state the notary’s old and new names and the effective date of the new name and include proof of the change of name as the Secretary of State shall require.When the form has been processed, a replacement certificate of appointment will be issued. The notary public must record the replacementcertificate of appointment containing the new name with the town clerk in the town wherein the notary recorded the original certificate of appointment and oath of office. If the notary uses a notary seal, the notary must purchase a notary seal that contains the notary’s new name. To download this form, visit the Secretary of State website at http://portal.ct.gov/SOTS/Legislative-Services/Notary-Public-Forms or click here.
     
    Death/Resignation/Removal:
    A Connecticut notary public, or his or her representative, is required to send a written and signed letter to the Secretary of State immediately if the notary: (1) no longer maintains residence in Connecticut during the term of the notary’s appointment; (2) no longer wishes to hold the office of notary public; (3) is deceased; (4) is duty-bound to resign by court order or the Secretary of State revocation process; or (5)no longer maintains a principal place of business in Connecticut (for nonresident notary). In the case of any of the above situations, the notary seal, if any, must be destroyed immediately.
     
    Prohibited Notarial Acts:
    These activities by a Connecticut notary public provide a basis for administrative disciplinary action:
  • Preparing, drafting, selecting, or giving advice concerning legal documents
  • Refusing to perform notarial acts in lawful transactions for any person who tenders payment of the statutory fee
  • Using the phrases “notario” and “notario publico” to advertise notary services
  • Notarizinga document with intent to deceive or defraud
  • Using the notary’s title or seal in an endorsement or promotional statement for any product, service, contest, or other offering
  • Notarizing a document without the signer being in the notary’s presence at the time of the notarization
  • Notarizing a document wherein he or she is a signatory of the document
  • Signing a notarial certificate under any other name than the one under which the notary was commissioned
  • Using a signature stamp to notarize
  • Allowing another individual to sign on his or her behalf as a notary public
  • Notarizing his or her own signature
  • Acting as a translator and notary public at the same time in connection with the same document
  • Notarizing a document if he or she has a financial or beneficial interest in it
  • Performing a copy certification of a vital record
  • Notarizing a document for a signer who was clearly incompetent
  • Notarizing for a minor who was not identified by satisfactory evidence of identity
  • Notarizing a handwritten will with no knowledge of how to notarize such documents
  • Notarizing a “Living Will” with no knowledge on how to notarize such documents
  • Notarizing a document in a foreign language with a notarial certificate that the notary was not able to read or understand
  • Notarizing a document that contains blanks
  • Notarizing a document when the notary had a financial and personal interest in the document
  • Allowing another person to complete a notarial certificate when the notary was not present
  •  
    Official Notarial Misconduct:
    Connecticut notaries public who commit official malfeasance may be subject to criminal liability, civil liability, and administrative disciplinary action as follows:

     

    Sec. 3-95a. Prohibition re: notary offering or providing legal advice in immigration matters. Use of title of notario or notario publico.

  • (a) A notary public shall not offer or provide legal advice to any person in immigration matters or represent any person in immigration proceedings unless such notary public (1) has been admitted as an attorney under the provisions of section 51-80, or (2) is authorized pursuant to 8 CFR 292.2 to practice immigration law or represent persons in immigration proceedings.
  • (b) A notary public shall not assume, use, or advertise the title of notario or notario publico, unless such notary public (1) has been admitted as an attorney under the provisions of section 51-80, or (2) indicates in any advertisement or otherwise provides written notice that such notary public is not licensed as an attorney in this state.
  • (c) Any notary public who violates any provision of this section shall have committed a violation of subsection (a) of section 51-88 and be subject to the penalties set forth in subsection (b) of section 51-88.
  •  

    Sec. 51-88. Practice of law by persons not admitted as attorneys. Exceptions.

  • (a) Unless a person is providing legal services pursuant to statute or rule of the Superior Court, a person who has not been admitted as an attorney under the provisions of section 51-80 or, having been admitted under section 51-80, has been disqualified from the practice of law due to resignation, disbarment, being placed on inactive status or suspension, shall not: (1) Practice law or appear as an attorney-at-law for another in any court of record in this state, (2) make it a business to practice law or appear as an attorney-at-law for another in any such court, (3) make it a business to solicit employment for an attorney-at-law, (4) hold himself or herself out to the public as being entitled to practice law, (5) assume to be an attorney-at-law, (6) assume, use or advertise the title of lawyer, attorney and counselor-at-law, attorney-at-law, counselor-at-law, attorney, counselor, attorney and counselor, or an equivalent term in such manner as to convey the impression that he or she is a legal practitioner of law, (7) advertise that he or she, either alone or with others, owns, conducts or maintains a law office, or office or place of business of any kind for the practice of law, or (8) otherwise engage in the practice of law as defined by statute or rule of the Superior Court.
  • (b) (1) Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be guilty of a class D felony, except that in any prosecution under this section, if the defendant proves by a preponderance of the evidence that the defendant committed the proscribed act or acts while admitted to practice law before the highest court of original jurisdiction in any state, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico or a territory of the United States or in a district court of the United States and while a member in good standing of such bar, such defendant shall be guilty of a class C misdemeanor.
  • Connecticut Notary Laws and Regulations:
    Connecticut General Statutes, Title 3, Chapter 33, Sections 3-94a to 3-95a, “Notaries Public”
    https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_033.htm

     

    Connecticut General Statutes,Title 1, Chapter 6, “Uniform Acknowledgment Act”
    https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_006.htm

     

    Connecticut General Statutes, Title 1, Chapter 8, “Uniform Recognition of Acknowledgments Act”
    https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_008.htm

     

    Connecticut Notarial Certificates:
    Click here to view Connecticut’s notarial certificates.

    Revised: January 2018

    Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this page. Information this page is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their state if they have legal questions about how to notarize.
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