Notary Tips

What is a Notario Publico?

by American Association of Notaries
In its simplest form, the term notario publico translates to notary public. On a deeper level, however, the difference between a notario publico and a U.S. notary public is vast, and therefore it can be problematic for notaries to use this particular terminology in the United States. While a notary public in the United States is authorized to perform specific notarial acts and practice limited discretion, a notario publico in many Latin American countries is an individual who has received the equivalent of a law license and who is authorized to represent others before the government. (more...)

Notarizing Documents in Foreign Languages

by American Association of Notaries
I've had this question come up twice in the past couple of weeks, so I thought it would probably make for an interesting article. As notaries, we are approached to notarize documents for a number of different reasons. (more...)

Everything a Notary Must Know about an Apostille

by American Association of Notaries
According to the Hague Conference on Private International Law, An apostille is a certificate that authenticates the origin of a public document. In order for the apostille to be used, both the issuing and receiving countries must be party to the Apostille Convention. Additional information about the Apostille Convention can be found in the publication ABCs of Apostilles. In addition, the following link provides a list of countries belonging to the Apostille Convention. (more...)

Summer is Split-signing Time for Notary Signing Agents!

by American Association of Notaries
Vacation time is here, school is out, and families have started traveling. Notaries will see a few more split-signing appointments than usual. (more...)

Can a Notary Sign for a Disabled Person

by American Association of Notaries
I've had several appointments during which the signer was unable to physically sign his name to a document. I can see the family members are really worried about this when it happens. Many want to know if they can sign for the signer. I have to explain that unless they've been given a power of attorney by the signer, I am unable to notarize a document signed by them for the signer. (more...)

Resources to Help with Your Notary Business

by American Association of Notaries
I receive numerous phone calls and emails from notaries and other people who are interested in starting their own notary public businesses. These inquires come from all over the United States. They all want to know how to get their businesses started. (more...)
Listed in: Marketing, Mobile Notary

Can you notarize this photograph?

by American Association of Notaries
A notary should be prepared to explain to a client that notary law does not allow notaries merely to place their official notary seal and official notary signature on a document or photo in order to make it acceptable by the receiving party. A notary is almost always required to administer an oath or take an acknowledgment and complete a notarial certificate pertaining to the notarial act he or she performed. (more...)

What is in Your Notary Bag?

by American Association of Notaries
As notaries, we cannot do our jobs without the proper notary supplies. One of the most important tools in our arsenal of notary supplies is the notary stamp. While every state has different requirements for notaries, the notary stamps, seals, notary journals and other notary supplies are pretty standard. (more...)
Listed in: Notary Supplies

Marketing to Title Companies

by American Association of Notaries
Like most notary signing agents, I went through the drill of contacting all of the four- and five-star signing companies listed on one of the well known signing agent directories. After I got a couple of years of experience under my belt, I decided to narrow my marketing efforts to local title companies. (more...)

How Much Do You Charge for Notary Services?

by American Association of Notaries
This is a somewhat sticky question for mobile notaries. Why? Well, how much you charge depends on a number of factors. (more...)
American Association of Notaries Logo
Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries seeks to provide timely articles for notaries to assist them with information and ideas for managing their notary businesses, enhancing their notary educations, and securing their notary supplies but makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained . Information in this article is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their state if they have legal questions about how to notarize.
0 Products $0.00
View Cart | Checkout