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How to Become an Alaska Notary


The Alaska Notary Process:


Are you interested in becoming an Alaska notary? Are you interested in generating extra income, starting your own Alaska notary business, adding a notary title to your resume, or helping people in your community? The State of Alaska appoints notaries to serve the public as unbiased impartial witnesses to document signing. Becoming a notary in Alaska is a straightforward process, and as long as you meet the eligibility requirements listed below, you can apply to become an Alaska notary. The America Association of Notaries has been helping individuals become notaries since 1994.

 

This guide will help you understand:

  1. Who can become an Alaska notary
  2. The process to become an Alaska notary
  3. Basic Alaska notarial duties

What are the qualifications to become an Alaska notary?


To become an Alaska notary public, a notary applicant must meet the following requirements:

  1. Be at least 18 years of age.
  2. Be legally residing in the United States.
  3. Be a resident of Alaska by being physically present in this state with the intent to remain indefinitely and by maintaining an abode in Alaska.
  4. Not have been convicted of a felony or incarcerated in a correctional facility for a felony conviction within ten years before the commission takes effect.
  5. Not have had a notary public commission revoked for failure to comply with notary law or for incompetence or malfeasance in carrying out the duties of a notary public in this jurisdiction or another jurisdiction within ten years before the commission takes effect.
  6. Not have been disciplined for notarial misconduct in this jurisdiction or another jurisdiction where such disciplinary action prohibits the person from holding a notary public commission.

What is the process to become an Alaska notary?


To become an Alaska notary public and receive an Alaska notary public commission, a notary applicant must:

  1. Meet the eligibility requirements provided in the previous section.
  2. Obtain a notary bond in the amount of $2,500 before submitting an Alaska Notary Commission Application.
  3. Complete the application form or apply online with the Office of the Lieutenant Governor.
  4. Execute the oath of office on the application before a notary public.
  5. Send the original notarized hard copy application, the original surety bond, and the $40 application fee to the Office of the Lieutenant Governor. 

 

Note: Applicants who have internet access, an active myAlaska account, the ability to receive email messages and to scan documents, and who can pay the $40 application fee with Visa or Master Card may now apply online through the State’s online notary database. Online applicants are required to print out the oath of office, have it notarized, and scan and upload the notarized oath into the system. The executed and notarized bond form must be scanned and uploaded into the system at the time the application is completed. An applicant for a limited governmental notary public commission who is employed by the state may not be required to pay an application fee.

Can a non-resident become a notary in Alaska?

No. An individual who is not a resident of Alaska by being physically present in Alaska with the intent to remain indefinitely and by maintaining an abode in Alaska does not qualify for an Alaska notary public commission.

How much does it cost to become a notary in Alaska?

An Alaska notary applicant’s expenses may include the following:    

  1. A $40 filing fee to process a notary commission application.
  2. The cost of a $2,500 notary bond.
  3. The price of a notary stamp.
  4. The cost of a journal.
  5. The fee for an E&O insurance policy if an Alaska notary public wishes to purchase such a policy for his or her personal protection against liability.

How do I renew my Alaska notary commission?

Neither the Alaska notary statute nor the Office of Lieutenant Governor provides the process for renewing a notary public commission.  However, the Office of Lieutenant Governor recommends that a notary public submit his or her notary commission application thirty days before the current commission expires if the notary wishes to retain the same month and day as his or her current commission. The Office of Lieutenant Governor will not process a renewal notary commission application until thirty days prior to the expiration of a notary’s current commission. The renewal application process is the same as for the initial notary commission application for a notary public.  To renew a notary public commission, click here.

Are there any exams or notary courses required to become an Alaska notary public or to renew my Alaska notary public commission?

No. The Alaska notary statute does not require new applicants seeking an appointment as a notary public or renewing notaries public to take a course of study or examination to be commissioned as notaries public in Alaska. The Office of Lieutenant Governor recommends that any new applicant seeking an Alaska notary public commission take and complete an educational course of study so that the notary applicant can clearly understand the state notary laws, the notarial duties and responsibilities, and the general principles and practices of a notary public.

Can I perform electronic notarization in Alaska?

Yes. The Alaska 31st Legislature (2020) passed House Bill 124, which includes a provision authorizing a notary public to select one or more tamper-evident technologies with which to perform notarial acts with respect to electronic records (AS §44.50.145). This bill becomes effective January 1, 2021. In addition, the State of Alaska has enacted the “Uniform Electronic Transactions Act,” which authorizes a notary public to obtain an electronic or digital signature and electronic seal to notarize electronic documents in the physical presence of the individual seeking the notarization. Lastly, Section 44.50.063 of the Alaska Statutes provides the statutory authorization of electronic signatures and electronic seals used by Alaska notaries public.

 

Before a notary public performs his or her initial notarial act with respect to an electronic record, the notary public must notify the Lieutenant Governor that he or she will be performing notarial acts with respect to electronic records. All the same rules, standards, practices, and regulations that apply to a traditional paper notarization also apply to an electronically signed document, including the requirement to personally appear before the notary public. The State of Alaska has not yet adopted permanent regulations that establish standards, guidelines, and procedures for the performance of notarial acts with respect to electronic records.

What is the process to become an Alaska electronic notary public?

Before a notary public performs the initial notarial act with respect to an electronic record, he or she must:

  1. Notify the Office of Lieutenant Governor that he or she will be performing notarial acts with respect to electronic records.  
  2. Provide the Lieutenant Governor with a description of the communication technology he or she intends to use to perform notarial acts with respect to electronic records.
  3. Make sure that the communication technology he or she intends to use to perform notarial acts with respect to electronic records conforms to the standards established by the Lieutenant Governor in accordance with the Alaska Statutes, Title 44, Chapter 50 and the promulgated administrative rules.

 

If the communication technology conforms to the standards, the Lieutenant Governor shall approve the use of the notary public’s communication technology.

 

A person may not require a notary public to perform a notarial act with respect to an electronic record with a technology that the notary public has not selected (AS §44.50.145an). House Bill 124 (2020) provides that a recorder may accept for recording a tangible copy of an electronic record containing a notarial certificate as satisfying any requirement that a record accepted for recording be an original, if the notarial officer executing the notarial certificate certifies that the tangible copy is an accurate copy of the electronic record (AS §44.50.145[c]). For further information regarding electronic notarization, visit the Office of Lieutenant Governor at: https://ltgov.alaska.gov/notaries-public/.

Can I perform remote (online) notarizations in Alaska?

Yes. The Alaska 31th Legislature enacted House Bill 124 (2020), which includes the remote online notarization provisions. House Bill 124 was signed into law on April 30, 2020 and becomes effective on January 1, 2021. House Bill 124 authorizes Alaska notaries public to perform notarial acts for remotely located individuals using communications technology that complies with the standards adopted by the Lieutenant Governor.

 

House Bill 124 also states that a remotely located individual may comply with AS §44.50.062(5)(A) by using communication technology to appear before a notary public. The new act requires a notary public to be located in the state of Alaska to perform a notarial act using communication technology for a remotely located individual. House Bill 124 requires the Lieutenant Governor to adopt permanent regulations to carry out the purposes of Title 44, Chapter 50 of the Alaska Statutes, which include the new remote notarization provisions.  Before a notary public performs the notary public’s initial notarial act for a remotely located individual, he or she must notify the Office of the Lieutenant Governor that he or she will be performing notarial acts with respect to remotely located individuals using communication technology.

What is the process to become an Alaska remote online notary public?

Before a notary public performs his or her initial notarial act for a remotely located individual, the notary public must:

 

  1. Notify the Office of the Lieutenant Governor that he or she will be performing notarial acts with respect to remotely located individuals using communications technology.
  2. Provide the Lieutenant Governor with a description of the communications technologies the notary public intends to use to perform notarial acts with respect to remotely located individuals.
  3. Make sure that the communications technology the notary public intends to use to perform notarial acts for remotely located individuals conforms to the standards established by the Lieutenant Governor by adopted regulations.
  4. Act in accordance with the requirements, powers, and duties of a notary public under Title 44, Chapter 50 of the Alaska Statutes and the remote notarization provisions.

 

A notary public is required to maintain a journal in which he or she chronicles all notarial acts with respect to remotely located individuals. For additional information regarding the notary public’s approval to perform notarial acts with respect to remotely located individuals, visit the Office of the Lieutenant Governor at:  https://ltgov.alaska.gov/notaries-public/.

How long is the term of a notary public commission in Alaska?

The term of office for an Alaska notary public is four years commencing with the date specified in the notary public commission (AS §44.50.010[b]). However, a notary’s commission may be rendered void:   

  1. By resignation, death, or revocation.
  2. When a notary public ceases to reside in the state of Alaska during his or her commission term.
  3. When a notary public has been convicted of a felony offense that has become final and no pardon or certificate of restoration of citizenship rights has been granted.

 

Note: The term of a limited governmental notary public commission coincides with the term of government employment.

Is an Alaska notary bond required to become a notary in Alaska?

Yes. An Alaska official bond in the amount of $2,500 is required for all new applicants seeking appointments as notaries public and for renewing notaries public (AS §44.50.034). A notary bond may be purchased through an insurance agency, in which case the notary public will be commercially bonded. New applicants and renewing notaries must submit their commercial notary bond and any supporting documentation provided from their insurance/bonding company as part of their commission application. The bond must be for a term of four years from the date of commission.

 

If new applicants and/or renewing notaries prefer not to purchase a commercial bond, the mandatory bond requirement can be obtained using a private bond that comes from a business, organization, or private individual who acts as a private surety on behalf of a notary public, in which case, the notary public will be privately bonded. In such case, the new applicant and/or renewing notary public is required to submit a signed and notarized notary bond form from the Office of the Lieutenant Governor with his or her notary commission application. It is not necessary to submit the state’s notary bond form in addition to a commercial notary bond.  The blank notary bond form is only intended to be used by applicants and renewing notaries who are supplying their own third party individual surety. New applicants and/or renewing notaries may not function as their own sureties.

 

The bond obligates a notary public’s surety unconditionally for the entire four-year period of the notary’s commission. If a notary public chooses to fill out the State’s notary bond form instead of purchasing a commercial notary bond, the notary public’s surety must understand that once the notary’s commission is issued, the surety will be liable for the bond for the entire four year period and will not be able to withdraw from their obligation as surety.  A notary public may submit subsequent bonds (to become effective upon receipt), but a notary’s surety does not have the ability to withdraw support from a bond once it has been accepted by the State and the notary public commission has been issued.

Do I need an Alaska notary errors and omission insurance?

No. An errors and omissions insurance policy is optional in Alaska. It is not mandatory to have E&O insurance when applying for appointment as a notary public. However, the American Association of Notaries strongly recommends that Alaska notaries obtain an errors and omissions insurance policy for their personal protection against liability. Errors and omissions insurance is designed to protect notaries public from liability against unintentional notarial mistakes or omissions that result in financial or other type of loss to the public or from a client who sues a notary public for recovery. An E&O policy customarily covers legal fees and damages based on the coverage an Alaska notary public selects.

Where can I perform notarial acts in Alaska?

An Alaska notary public has statewide jurisdiction and may perform notarial acts in any county anywhere within the geographic borders of the State of Alaska. Likewise, an Alaska notary public may not perform notarial acts outside of Alaska.

Who appoints Alaska notaries public?

The Office of Lieutenant Governor receives applications for appointment and reappointment as a notary public, processes the applications for limited governmental notaries public, administers the commissioning process for all notaries public, and maintains the Notary Database Online. To contact the Office of Lieutenant Governor:

 

Office of Lieutenant Governor
Notary Public Office
240 Main Street, Room 301
Juneau, AK 99801
(907) 465-3509 or (877) 764-1234 (toll-free within Alaska)
Email: notary@alaska.gov
https://ltgov.alaska.gov/notaries-public/

Do I need to purchase a notary stamp in Alaska?

Yes. The Alaska notary statute requires all notaries public to use a rubber stamp or an embosser seal to authenticate their official acts (AS §44.50.065an). Section 44.50.064 of the Alaska Statutes provides the legal specifications regarding the layout and the information required on a notary public’s official seal. For Alaska notary supplies, visit the American Association of Notaries website at www.usnotaries.com, by calling 800.721.2663, or click here.

 

Dimensions: The inked stamp or embosser seal may be: (1) a circular form not over two inches in diameter; (2) a rectangular form not more than one inch in width by two and one-half inches in length; or (3) an electronic form as authorized by regulations adopted by the Lieutenant Governor.

 

Required Elements: A notary public’s official seal must be photographically reproducible when embossed, stamped, or printed on a document, and it must contain the following:

  1. The name of the notary public exactly as indicated on the notary public’s commission certificate.
  2. The words “Notary Public”.
  3. The words “State of Alaska”.  
  4. Optional:  “My commission expires (date)”.

 

Section 09.63.030(c) states, “If the document is sworn to or affirmed before a notary public of the state, the notary public shall affix on the document the: (A) notary public’s official signature and official seal; and (B) date of expiration of the notary public’s commission.” An embossed seal impression that is not photographically reproducible may be used in addition to, but not in place of, the seal impression or depiction required by Section 44.064(a).

 

A notary public may use a seal in electronic form on electronic documents notarized by the notary public as authorized by regulations adopted by the Lieutenant Governor (AS §44.50.065[d]). A notary public’s official seal must be affixed on the notarial certificate near the notary’s official signature and only at the time the notarial act is performed. A notary public is prohibited from affixing his or her official seal to a document unless the person who is to sign the document appears and signs the document before the notary public, except as provided by AS §44.50.075 (remotely located individuals).

 

Very Important: If the notary public’s official seal is stolen, lost, or the security of the notary’s official electronic seal is compromised, the notary public must provide a written notification to the Lieutenant Governor within ten days of the theft, loss, or compromised security (AS §44.50.064[d]).

Do I need an electronic notary stamp to notarize electronically in Alaska?

Yes. The Alaska 31st Legislature passed House Bill 124 (2020), which includes a provision authorizing a notary public to select one or more tamper-evident technologies with which to perform notarial acts with respect to electronic records (AS §40.50.145). The bill becomes effective January 1, 2021. In addition, the State of Alaska has enacted the “Uniform Electronic Transactions Act,” which authorizes a notary public to obtain an electronic or digital signature and electronic seal to notarize electronic documents in the physical presence of the individual seeking the notarization.

 

A notary public may use a seal in electronic form on electronic documents notarized by the notary public as authorized by regulations adopted by the Lieutenant Governor (AS §44.50.065[d]). The Lieutenant Governor has not yet adopted a permanent regulation that provides the electronic seal format required of a notary public who performs notarial acts with respect to electronic records.

Is a notary journal required in Alaska?

Yes. The Alaska notary statute requires a notary public to maintain a journal in which the notary public chronicles all notarial acts that the notary public performs under AS §44.50.075 (notarial acts for remotely located individuals). A notary public may create a journal on a tangible medium or in an electronic format. A notary public shall maintain at least one journal in a tangible medium to chronicle all notarial acts using communications technology for remotely located individuals. A notary public may maintain one or more journals in an electronic format to chronicle all notarial acts with respect to remotely located individuals. If a journal is maintained in an electronic format, the journal must be in a permanent, tamper-evident electronic format complying with the regulations of the Lieutenant Governor under AS §44.50.072.

 

A notary public must make an entry in a journal contemporaneously with performance of the notarial act. The Alaska statute prescribes the specifics a notary public is required to record in the notary’s journal for each notarial act performed for a remotely located individual. Alaska notaries must retain their journals for ten years after the performance of the last notarial act chronicled (AS §44.50.078an). If a notary public's journal is lost or stolen, the notary public must promptly notify the Lieutenant Governor upon discovering that the journal is lost or stolen. If a notary resigns his or her commission, or if the commission is revoked or suspended, the notary public must retain his or her journal as specified by state notary law and inform the Lieutenant Governor where the journal is located. The American Association of Notaries and the Lieutenant Governor recommend that all Alaska notaries public maintain journals of all the notarial acts they perform. For Alaska notary supplies, visit the American Association of Notaries website, call (800) 721-2663, or click here.

How much can an Alaska notary charge for performing notarial acts?

The maximum fees a notary public may charge for notarial services have not been addressed in the Alaska Statutes. Nor has the Lieutenant Governor adopted regulations that set forth the notarial fees a notary public may charge for notarial services. The fees that Alaska notaries public may charge for notarial services are at their discretion. Section 44.50.062(4) of the Alaska Statutes states, “A notary public may not charge a fee for a notarial act unless a fee schedule has been provided to the signer before the performance of the notarial act.” If a notary public intends to collect a fee for his or her notarial services, he or she must provide the document signer with a published fee schedule prior to the performance of the notarial act.

What notarial acts can an Alaska notary public perform?

An Alaska notary public is authorized to perform the following notarial acts, whether performed with respect to a tangible or electronic record, that is identified as a notarial act under AS §09.63.120 and an act that a notary public is directed to perform under AS §44.50.060 (AS §44.50.200):

  1. Taking acknowledgments.
  2. Administering oaths and affirmations.
  3. Attesting documents.
  4. Taking verifications on oath and affirmation (AS §09.63.040).
  5. Administering protests (AS §45.03.505[b]).

How do I update my address for my Alaska notary commission?

Within thirty days of a change in a notary public's mailing address, physical address, or contact information, the notary public must submit a written notification of the change on a form provided by the Lieutenant Governor (AS §44.50.066an). The notary public must submit a signed Name and Address Change Form and a $5 filing fee to the Lieutenant Governor by mail, email, or fax (907) 465-5400. Notarization is not required if a notary public is not changing his or her name. To download the Name and Address Change form, visit the Office of the Lieutenant Governor’s website.

Do I have to change my name on my notary commission in Alaska?

An Alaska notary public whose name legally changed during the notary’s commission term must provide a written notice of the new name on the Name and Address Change Form provided by the Lieutenant Governor within thirty days after such a name change. To obtain a replacement certificate of commission with the notary public’s new name, the notary public reporting a name change must:

  1. Obtain a new identification card in his or her new name.
  2. Fill out the Name and Address Change Form completely.
  3. Have his or her signature on the oath of office notarized.
  4. Pay a $5 filing fee.
  5. Mail the completed and notarized name change form to the address indicated in the instructions for filling out the form (no fax or email copies accepted).

 

When the notary public receives the updated commission certificate reflecting the notary’s new name change, the notary public must:

  1. Purchase a new notary seal that reflects the notary’s new name.
  2. Notify the surety/bonding company responsible for his or her notary bond of the new name change and update the notary bond.
  3. Obtain a bond rider that reflects the notary’s new name.
  4. Mail the name change bond rider to the Lieutenant Governor.

 

The Lieutenant Governor may require a notary public to update the information required under AS §44.50.032, including the notary public's current notarized signature and information regarding the notary public's electronic signature. To download the Name and Address Change Form, visit the Lieutenant Governor’s website or click here.

Alaska notarial certificates:

Click here to view your state's notarial certificates.

 

 

 

Revised: November 2020

Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this page. Information this page is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their state if they have legal questions about how to notarize.

Notary bonds and errors and omissions insurance policies provided by this insurance agency, American Association of Notaries, Inc., are underwritten by Western Surety Company, Universal Surety of America, or Surety Bonding Company of America, which are subsidiaries of CNA Surety.