Back to My Account / Member Center / Q&A

To view the FAQs, please pick a state by selecting one from the dropdown menu above in the header.

Notarial Fees


What is the maximum amount I can charge for my notary services?

A notary public must not charge or receive a fee for notary services over the maximum amount prescribed by state notary laws. A notary public must check state notary laws for the prescribed fees a notary public may charge in the performance of a notarial act.

Am I required to post a fee schedule. If so, where can I get one?

Some states mandate that notaries post a fee schedule listing the fees a notary public may charge for notary services in a conspicuous place at all times in their respective offices. Some notaries merely create their own fee schedule. However, the private notary associations normally offer the state-required fee schedule for a set fee. Even if state notary laws do not require such display, this Association highly recommends that notaries post a fee schedule of what they can charge in a location visible to the public at all times.

Can I charge a fee for my travel when providing notary services?

Most states generally do not establish fees for mileage and/or travel expenses that a notary public may charge in the performance of a notarial act. In states where travel fees are not addressed in the notary laws, a notary may charge reasonable fees for mileage and/or travel expenses. However, the person requesting the notarization and the notary public should agree in advance regarding the additional fees charged for mileage and/or travel expenses.

If I charge fees for travel and other services in connection with a notarization, do I have to itemize my fees in order to separate my notary fees?

Yes. The notary who charges travel fees should itemize such fees separately from those fees charged for the notarization. Generally, the notary statutes in most states mandate that notaries public may not charge or receive a fee for notary services over the maximum amount prescribed by state laws.

Do I have to charge a fee for every notarial act performed?

Most states prescribed the fees that a notary public may charge for the performance of a notarial act, but such notary laws do not prohibit a notary public from not charging a fee for the performance of a notarial act.

My employer is requiring me to charge a higher fee for my
notary services than prescribed by the state notary laws. Can I get in trouble for it?

Yes. A notary public who charges or receives a fee for notary services over the maximum amount prescribed by state notary laws is subject to disciplinary actions by the state’s commissioning authority. In some states, overcharging for notary services carries civil and criminal liability.

Can I charge for notarizing the signature on an absentee ballot or absentee voter registration?

Some states prohibit their notaries from charging or collecting a fee for notarizing a signature on any absentee ballot or absentee voter registration. Please consult with your state’s commissioning authority for further information regarding this subject matter.

Can I keep the fees charged for my notary services
that were collected during business hours even though my employer paid for my notary commission? What about fees collected after business hours?

It is not uncommon for an employer to pay for the notary commission of its employees and expect that such notaries provide notary services for the clients of the business, and any fees collected for such notarizations are retained by the employer. However, the fees collected after work hours for notary services are the property of the notary public.

Do I have to declare my notary fees as earned income to the IRS?

Yes. Earnings received from notary services are considered earned income for the purposes of the United States Internal Revenue Services.

The Wells Fargo notary public charged my mother-in-law for notary services because she was not a customer of the bank. Can a notary discriminate against non-customers of the bank?

It is not uncommon for an employer to require its notaries public not to charge notarial fees for the employer’s customers/clients during business hours. We encourage notaries that if they do not charge their customers for notary services, they should have a fair and consistent policy of not charging notary fees to non-customers of the employer as well. Your state’s commissioning authority should be able to provide you with notary law information.

A notary charged me $45 to notarize my signature on one document. Did she overcharge me for her notary services?

Most states set forth the fees a notary public may charge for notarial services. The notary public who charges more than the maximum fee prescribed by state law may lose his or her notary commission for such official misconduct. Contact the state’s commissioning authority for further information.

I went to a notary to get three powers of attorney documents notarized because I wanted originals, and the notary charged me $90. I told her that she could only charge me $6 a signature. The notary stated that she could charge whatever she wanted. Is she correct?

No, a notary cannot charge whatever price he or she wants. The notary statutes in most states mandate that notaries public may not charge or receive a fee for notary services over the maximum amount prescribed by state statute. The notary public who charges more than the maximum fee may lose his or her notary commission for such official misconduct. Contact the state’s commissioning authority for further information.