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How to Become a Notary in Connecticut


The Connecticut Notary Process:


Are you interested in becoming a Connecticut notary? Are you interested in generating extra income, starting your own Connecticut notary business, adding a notary title to your resume, or helping people in your community? The State of Connecticut appoints notaries to serve the public as unbiased impartial witnesses to document signing. Becoming a notary in Connecticut is a straightforward process, and as long as you meet the eligibility requirements listed below, you can apply to become a Connecticut notary. The America Association of Notaries has been helping individuals become notaries since 1994.

 

This guide will help you understand:

  1. Who can become a Connecticut notary
  2. The process to become a Connecticut notary
  3. Basic Connecticut notarial duties

What are the qualifications to become a Connecticut notary?


To become a Connecticut notary public, a notary applicant must meet the following requirements:

 

  1. Be 18 years of age or older.
  2. Be a resident of the state of Connecticut or have a principal place of business in the state.
  3. Pass a written examination approved or administered by the Secretary of State.

What is the process to become a Connecticut notary?


To become a Connecticut notary public and receive a Connecticut Certificate of Appointment, a notary applicant must:   

 

1. Meet the eligibility requirements provided in the previous section.

2. Complete an Application for Appointment as a Notary Public form partly online and partly in the applicant’s own handwriting. (All applicants must provide a valid email address and all correspondence will be sent to that address.)

3. Take the written examination that is incorporated into the online notary public application form and pass the exam with a 100% score.

4. Complete a jurat and writing sample during the online application process. (The writing sample must be completed in the handwriting of the notary public. The jurat must be subscribed and sworn to before a person authorized to administer an oath.) 

5. Have the certificate of character that is part of the application completed and signed by a public official or a reputable business or professional person who is unrelated to the applicant and has personally known the applicant for at least one year.

6. Submit all of the abovementioned requirements and pay a filing fee of $120.

7. Go to the eLicense website at https://www.elicense.ct.gov to register for an account. (Select “Online Service,” “Initial Application,” and then “Notary Public Certification” and follow the onscreen prompts to complete the application.)

8. Take an oath of office before a town clerk or notary public upon receiving the Certificate of Appointment issued by the Secretary of State.

9. Record the Certificate of Appointment and oath of office with the town clerk in the town in which the notary public resides within thirty days of receiving the Certificate of Appointment and pay a filing fee of $20. 

 

Take Note: An application left pending by the applicant in the system for greater than ninety days will result in a failure. If a submitted application is deficient, the applicant will have ninety days to correct the deficiencies, or the application and fee will be forfeited.

 

The Secretary of the State may deny an application for appointment or reappointment as a notary public based on: (1) the applicant’s conviction of a felony or a crime involving dishonesty or moral turpitude; (2) revocation, suspension, or restriction of a notary public appointment or professional license issued to the applicant by this state or any other state; or (3) the applicant’s official misconduct, whether or not any disciplinary action has resulted. Such actions could indicate that the individual would have difficulty meeting the high standard of honesty and integrity that all notaries public must maintain.

Can a non-resident become a notary in Connecticut?

Yes. A non-resident can become a Connecticut notary public. In order to qualify, a nonresident must:

 

  1. Meet the same eligibility requirements as a Connecticut resident.
  2. Maintains his or her principal place of business in the state of Connecticut at the time of application and appointment.
  3. Complete an Application for Appointment as a Notary Public form partly online and partly in the applicant’s own handwriting.
  4. Pass the written examination that is incorporated into the online notary public application.
  5. Complete a jurat and writing sample during the online application process.  
  6. Have the certificate of character that is part of the application completed and signed by a public official or a reputable business or professional person who is unrelated to the nonresident.
  7. Submit all of the abovementioned requirements and pay a filing fee of $120.
  8. Go to the eLicense website at https://www.elicense.ct.gov to register for an account and follow the onscreen prompts to complete the notary application.
  9. Take an oath of office before a town clerk or notary public upon receiving the Certificate of Appointment issued by the Secretary of State.
  10. Record the Certificate of Appointment and oath of office with the town clerk of the town in which the principal place of business is located within thirty days of receiving the certificate and pay a filing fee of $20.

How much does it cost to become a notary in Connecticut?

A Connecticut notary applicant’s expenses may include the following:  

 

  1. A $120 filing fee to process an application for appointment as a notary public.
  2. A $60 filing fee to process an application for renewal of appointment as a notary public.
  3. A $20 filing fee to record the notary’s oath of office and Certificate of Appointment with the town clerk.
  4. The cost of a notary official seal to authenticate all notarial acts (optional).
  5. The price of a journal to record all notarial acts performed as recommended by the Secretary of State.
  6. The cost of a notary surety bond (optional).  
  7. The fee for an errors and omissions insurance policy if a notary public wishes to obtain one for his or her personal protection against liability.

How do I renew my Connecticut notary commission?

Three months prior to the expiration date of his or her commission, the notary public will receive a letter from the Secretary of State either by email or mail notifying the notary public that his or her commission is expiring and providing the notary a PIN to use for fast track renewal.  A notary public may renew his or her commission up to within ninety days of its expiration date. The notary public must use the log-in information contained in the renewal correspondence, swear that he or she has not been convicted of a crime since the last appointment, and pay a fee of $60.00. A new Certificate of Appointment will be issued to the notary, and, as with an original appointment, the notary must take the oath of office and record his or her commission and oath of office with the town clerk. After ninety days, a notary public will be required to complete a reinstatement application, including the exam, in order to be reappointed for another term. If a notary public did not receive the renewal notification from the Secretary of State or needs another one, he or she must request another renewal notification by email from the Secretary of State at crd@ct.gov.

Are there any exams or notary courses required to become a Connecticut notary public or to renew my Connecticut notary public commission?

Yes. All new applicants for a Connecticut Certificate of Appointment are required to complete and pass (with a 100% score) the written examination that is incorporated into the online notary public application form. The examination is intended to be a comprehensive test of the applicant's knowledge and ability to perform his or her duties and responsibilities as a notary public.

Can I perform electronic notarization in Connecticut?

Yes. The state of Connecticut has not yet adopted statutes or regulations that establish rules, guidelines, standards, and procedures for electronic notarizations. However, Connecticut has adopted the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act, including the provision on notarization and acknowledgment, which authorizes electronic signatures used by Connecticut notaries. Section 1-276 states, “If a law requires a signature or record to be notarized, acknowledged, verified or made under oath, the requirement is satisfied if the electronic signature of the person authorized to perform such acts, together with all other information required to be included by other applicable law, is attached to or logically associated with the signature or record.” Connecticut has also adopted the Uniform Real Property Electronic Recording Act that authorizes electronic signatures used by Connecticut notaries public.  All the same rules, standards, practices, and regulations that apply to a traditional paper notarization also apply to an electronically signed document including, but not limited to, the personal appearance before the notary public. The Connecticut Secretary of State has yet to establish standards and practices by adopted regulations for performing electronic notarial acts with respect to electronic records.

Can I perform remote (online) notarizations in Connecticut?

Yes, temporarily. The Governor of Connecticut, Ned Lamont, authorized the use of remote notarization by Executive Order 7Q, effective March 30, 2020. Moreover, on June 16, 2020, Governor Lamont signed Executive Order 7ZZ, which extends the authorization to use remote notarization “for the duration of the public health and civil preparedness emergency, including any period of renewal of such emergency.” All active Connecticut notaries public are authorized by the Order to use remote notarization and must follow the procedures outlined in Executive Order 7Q if they choose to do so. Executive Order 7Q states that all relevant state laws and regulations are hereby modified to permit any notarial act that is required under Connecticut law to be performed using an electronic device or process that allows a notary public commissioned by the Connecticut Secretary of the State pursuant to Section 3-94b of the Connecticut General Statutes ("Notary Public") or a Commissioner of the Superior Court as defined by Section 51-85 of the Connecticut General Statutes ("Commissioner") and a remotely located individual to communicate with each other simultaneously by sight and sound using communication technology provided that the certain conditions are met such as the signatory must affirmatively represent via the communication technology that he or she is physically situated in the state of Connecticut. Before a notary public performs the initial notarial act for a remotely located individual, a notary public must notify the Connecticut Secretary of State that the notary public will be performing notarial acts with respect to remotely located individuals using communication technology. The Connecticut Secretary of State has yet to establish standards and practices by emergency or temporarily adopted regulations for the performance of remote notarial acts for remotely located individuals. To review the Governor’s Executive Orders referenced herein, go to the Secretary of State’s website at Notary Public Licensing (ct.gov).

How long is the term of a notary public commission in Connecticut?

The term of office of a Connecticut notary public is five years beginning on the date of such person’s appointment and ending on the last day of the month of appointment, unless: (1) such appointment as a notary public is suspended or terminated by the Secretary of State before the end of such term; (2) the notary public resigns such appointment; or (3) the notary public ceases to either be a resident of Connecticut or to have a principal place of business in the state (CGS §3-94ca).

Is a Connecticut notary bond required to become a notary in Connecticut?

No.  New applicants seeking appointments as notaries public and renewing notaries public applying for reappointment are not required by state notary statute to procure a notary bond in the state of Connecticut.

Do I need a Connecticut notary errors and omission insurance?

No. An errors and omissions insurance policy is optional in Connecticut. It is not mandatory to have E&O insurance when applying for appointment or reappointment as a notary public. The American Association of Notaries strongly recommends that Connecticut notaries public obtain an errors and omissions insurance policy for their personal protection against liability. Errors and omissions insurance is designed to protect notaries public from liability against unintentional notarial mistakes or omissions that result in financial or other type of loss to the public or a client who sues a notary public for recovery. An E&O policy customarily covers legal fees and damages based on the coverage a Connecticut notary public selects.

Where can I perform notarial acts in Connecticut?

A Connecticut notary public has statewide jurisdiction and may perform notarial acts anywhere within the geographic borders of the State of Connecticut.

Who appoints Connecticut notaries public?

The Connecticut Secretary of State oversees the applications for appointment and reappointment of notaries public, processes the applications for remote online notaries public, and administers the commissioning process. To contact the Connecticut Secretary of State:


Connecticut Secretary of State
Notary Public Unit

PO Box 150470
Hartford, CT 06115-0470
(860) 509-6002
Email: crd@ct.gov

Do I need to purchase a notary stamp in Connecticut?

No. The Connecticut notary statute does not require Connecticut notaries public to authenticate the notarial acts they perform with an official notarial seal. The use of an official notarial seal is optional.

 

Required Elements: If a notary public utilizes a notarial seal, the notary shall, near the notary’s official signature on a notarial certificate, affix an impression of the notarial seal, which shall include (CGS §3-94k):

 

  1. The notary’s name exactly as it appears on the notary’s certificate of appointment.
  2. The words “Notary Public.”
  3. The word “Connecticut.”
  4. The words “My commission expires (commission expiration date).”

 

If a notary public does not utilize a notarial seal, the notary public must type or print legibly near the notary’s official signature on a notarial certificate the words “Notary Public” and “My commission expires (commission expiration date).” Section 3-94ja states that a notarial seal shall not be used by any other person or surrendered to any employer upon termination of the notary’s employment. For Connecticut notary supplies, please contact the American Association of Notaries by visiting our website at www.usnotaries.com, call (800) 721-2663, or click here.

Is a notary journal required in Connecticut?

No. Connecticut notary law does not require that notaries public maintain a journal of their notarial acts. However, the Secretary of State and the American Association of Notaries strongly recommend that Connecticut notaries public maintain a chronological journal of their notarial acts in a permanent, paper-bound journal with consecutively numbered pages, designed to deter fraud as a protective measure against liability. The Secretary of State strongly believes that record keeping is the best way to ensure the proper conduct of notaries public, both to help protect them and to prevent fraud. Notaries public are protected when their notarial journals are well-maintained with clear and concise documentation that proper notarial procedures were followed in the performance of their notarial acts. Accurate record keeping is especially important when a number of years have lapsed since the notarial act was performed.

 

The Secretary of State recommends that Connecticut notaries record the following information for each transaction: (1) the date and time of the notarial act; (2) the nature or type of notarial act performed; (3) a description of the document or proceeding; (4) the signature, printed name, and address of each person for whom a notarial act is performed; (5) the method by which a person's identity has been determined; (6) the fee, if any is charged; and (7) the place where the notarial act was performed.

 

The American Association of Notaries recommends that Connecticut notaries public: (a) not surrender their journals and/or record to another notary public or to an employer upon termination of employment; (b) retain their journals for seven years after expiration of the last commission in which entry was made in the journal; and (c) leave instructions to have their journals delivered or mailed to the Secretary of State in the event of their deaths. For Connecticut notary supplies, please contact the American Association of Notaries by visiting our website at www.usnotaries.com, call (800) 721-2663, or click here.

How much can a Connecticut notary charge for performing notarial acts?

The Connecticut notary fees are set by state notary statute (CGS §3-95). The maximum allowable fees that a Connecticut notary public may charge for notarial acts are listed below:

 

  1. Taking an acknowledgment - $5.00
  2. Administering an oath or affirmation - $5.00
  3. For a jurat - $5.00
  4. Take a deposition - $5.00
  5. Copy certification - $5.00
  6. Execute a protest - $5.00

 

Note: A notary public may charge $0.35 for each mile of travel to perform a notarial act.

What notarial acts can a Connecticut notary public perform?

A Connecticut notary public is authorized to perform these notarial acts (CGS §§3-94a and 1-57):

 

  1. Take acknowledgments
  2. Administer oaths or affirmations
  3. Perform jurats
  4. Take depositions and issue subpoenas for depositions in civil actions and probate proceedings (CGS §§52-148a to 148e)
  5. Certify copies
  6. Execute protests (CGS §42a-3-505[b])

How do I update my address for my Connecticut notary commission?

All Connecticut notaries public who change their residence address are required to report the address change to the Secretary of State within thirty days. Non-resident notaries must maintain a principal place of business in Connecticut and must report any change in the address of their business or residence. If a notary public needs to report an address change, he or she should email the Secretary of State at crd@ct.gov.  The Secretary of State will send the notary public a password reset link to his or her eLicense account so that the notary public can make the address change for free. If a notary public needs assistance logging in, he or she may email the Office of the Secretary of State at crd@ct.gov to request password reset instructions that will enable the notary to log-in and change his or her address.

Do I have to change my name on my notary commission in Connecticut?

When a Connecticut notary public lawfully changes his or her name during the term of the notary’s appointment, the notary public is required to complete the Change of Name form and email it to the Office of the Secretary of State at crd@ct.gov.  The Office of the Secretary of State will email the notary public an invoice to pay the $15 statutory fee for a name change.  Once the $15 fee is received, the notary public will receive a replacement certificate of appointment by email with the notary’s new name. The Change of Name form submitted to the Secretary of State must include the notary public’s former name and the new name, the effective date of the new name, the reason for the name change, and the documentation verifying proof of the name change. Additionally, the form must be notarized.

 

It is not necessary for the notary public to take an oath of office upon receiving a replacement certificate of appointment, but if the notary public has relocated to a new town of residence or principal place of business, the replacement certificate must be recorded with the town clerk of that new town. If the notary public utilizes a notarial seal to authenticate a notarial act, the notary public must purchase a notarial seal that contains the notary’s new name. Visit the Secretary of State website to download the Change of Name form.

 

 

Revised: January 2021

Legal disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the information contained on this page. Information on this page is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding federal laws and statutes and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered the information from a variety of sources. We do not warrant the information gathered from those sources. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of an attorney in their states if they have legal questions about how to perform notarial acts.

Notary bonds and errors and omissions insurance policies provided by this insurance agency, American Association of Notaries, Inc., are underwritten by Western Surety Company, Universal Surety of America, or Surety Bonding Company of America, which are subsidiaries of CNA Surety.