Home > Become a Notary > How to Become a New Jersey Notary

How to Become a Notary in New Jersey


To become a notary in New Jersey, you must:


To become a notary public in New Jersey, you must:

  1. Meet the eligibility requirements detailed in the next section.
  2. Download and review the New Jersey Notary Public Manual from the New Jersey Department of the Treasury’s website.
  3. Complete the notary commissioning application on the New Jersey Department of the Treasury’s website (for non-attorney applicants only) and pay the service fee.
  4. Complete a six-hour course of study approved by the state treasurer. (At this time, reading the New Jersey Notary Public Manual satisfies the requirement for the course. In the future, the Division of Revenue and Enterprise Services will enhance the course by including materials and content. Check the state’s website for course requirement updates.)
  5. Take and pass the notary public online exam the state treasurer prescribes after paying up to a $15 fee.
  6. Complete the notary registration application and pay the $25 filing fee.
  7. Be sworn in before the clerk of the county in which you reside and pay the $15 fee within three months of receiving your notary commission.
  8. Endorse the certificate of commission and qualification after being sworn in by the clerk. The clerk shall transmit the certificate of commission to the state treasurer within ten days of the administration of the oath via an electronic method provided by the treasurer.

Important: If you cannot take the oath of office within the allowed time, your notary commission will be voided, and you will need to file a new application and pay another filing fee.

Who can become a notary public in New Jersey?


To become a notary in New Jersey, you must meet the following requirements:

  1. Be at least eighteen years of age.
  2. Be a legal resident of New Jersey or have a place of employment or practice in New Jersey.
  3. Not be disqualified for receiving a commission under section 9 of P.L.2021, c.179 (C.52:7-10.4 et al.).

This New Jersey notary guide will help you understand:


  1. Who can become a notary in New Jersey.
  2. How to become a notary in New Jersey.
  3. The basic duties of a notary in New Jersey.

How do I renew my notary commission in New Jersey?


If you are an active notary public and wish to renew your notary commission, you are not required to retake the notary public exam. You must submit your notary renewal application and complete a continuing education course. If it has been over thirty days since your notary commission expired, you will be considered a new notary applicant and must take the notary public exam.

Note a commissioned notary public applying to renew a commission who has satisfactorily completed the six-hour course of study and passed an examination prescribed by the state treasurer at least once or who was commissioned before the effective date of P.L. 2021 must take a three-hour continuing education course prescribed by the state treasurer.

Click here to renew your notary commission in New Jersey.

Who appoints notaries in New Jersey?


The state treasurer appoints and commissions New Jersey notaries, and the Department of the Treasury’s Notary Public Unit receives the applications for appointment and reappointment as a notary public, administers the commissioning process, and maintains an electronic database of active notaries.

The Notary Public Unit can be contacted at:

New Jersey Division of Revenue and Enterprise Services
Business Services Bureau/Notary Public Unit

PO Box 452
Trenton, NJ 08646-0452
Phone Numbers: (609) 292-0642
(609) 292-9292 (To check on a notary public application)
Website: https://www.njportal.com/DOR/Notary

Can a non-resident of New Jersey apply for a commission as a notary public?


Yes. A person who is not a legal resident of New Jersey may apply for a commission if they meet one of the following conditions:

  1. The applicant maintains or is regularly employed in an office in the state of New Jersey.
  2. The applicant is an employee of a business with its domicile or primary place of business in New Jersey and performs their employment duties remotely from a home office or a co-working space.

A non-resident who meets one of these criteria may apply by complying with the required application procedures via the online commissioning site at https://www.njportal.com/DOR/Notary/.

Note: The oath of office of a non-resident notary public shall be taken and subscribed before the clerk of the county in which the non-resident notary public maintains their office or the county in which they are an employee of a business with its domicile or primary place of business in New Jersey.

How long is a notary public's commission term in New Jersey?


The term of a New Jersey notary commission is five years, commencing on the date specified in the notary public’s commission certificate. However, a notary’s commission may be rendered void:

  1. By resignation, death, or revocation.
  2. When a notary is no longer a resident of New Jersey or, for non-resident notaries, no longer has a place of employment or practice in New Jersey.
  3. When a notary is convicted of a crime under the laws of any state or of the U.S. for an offense involving dishonesty or for a crime of the first or second degree.

Is notary training or an exam required to become a notary or to renew a notary commission in New Jersey?


Yes. A non-attorney applicant for an initial commission as a notary public must provide satisfactory proof that they have completed a six-hour course of study approved by the state treasurer and passed an examination prescribed by the state treasurer. The state treasurer may charge up to a $15 fee for each online test.

Also, a commissioned notary public applying to renew a commission who has satisfactorily completed the six-hour course of study and passed an examination prescribed by the state treasurer at least once or who was commissioned for the first time before the effective date of P.L. 2021, c.179 (July 2022), shall complete a three-hour continuing education course. The treasurer shall set forth the procedures for compliance with this provision and provide certificates of approval evidencing completion of the required education and testing online at https://www.njportal.com/DOR/Notary

How much does it cost to become a notary public in New Jersey?


To become a notary public in New Jersey, you must pay the following:

  1. A non-refundable $25 filing fee plus a New Jersey government services fee ($2.50 by credit card or $1 by e-check) to process a notary application.
  2. A fee that may be up to $15 for each test administered online by the state treasurer.
  3. A $15 fee to have the oath of office taken and recorded before the county clerk.

Other expenses include the cost of purchasing:

  1. New Jersey notary stamp.
  2. New Jersey notary journal to record all notarial acts performed.
  3. An errors and omissions insurance policy to protect yourself if you are sued for unintentional mistakes or if a false claim is filed against you as a notary. (This step is optional.)

Do I need a notary errors and omissions (E&O) insurance policy to become a notary in New Jersey?


A notary errors and omissions (E&O) insurance policy is optional in New Jersey and is not required to become a New Jersey notary public or to renew your notary commission. However, the American Association of Notaries strongly recommends that every New Jersey notary obtain a notary E&O insurance policy. This insurance protects you from a claim if a client sues you as a notary. A notary E&O policy covers unintentional notarial mistakes and pays for legal fees and damages based on the coverage a New Jersey notary public selects.

Do I need a notary bond to become a notary in New Jersey?


No. New Jersey does not require a notary bond to become a notary public or to renew your notary public commission.

Note: A notary public is liable to any person for damages that result from their negligence, errors, official malfeasance, or omissions. New Jersey notaries are encouraged to purchase a notary E&O insurance policy to insure themselves against such claims.

Do I need to order a notary stamp in New Jersey?


Yes. You must obtain a notary stamp to authenticate every notarial act that you perform.

The New Jersey notary stamp you purchase must meet the following requirements:

  1. It must include your notary name, the title “Notary Public, State of New Jersey,” and your notary commission expiration date.  
  2. It must be capable of being copied together with the record to which it is affixed or attached or with which it is logically associated.

Note:

  • If a notary public performs a notarial act regarding a tangible record, an official stamp must be affixed to or embossed on the certificate near the signature of the notary public and the impression must be clear and readable
  • If a notary public performs a notarial act regarding an electronic record, an official stamp must be attached to or logically associated with the certificate

To order a New Jersey notary stampnotary seal, complete notary package, and notary supplies, please visit the American Association of Notaries website at https://www.notarypublicstamps.com/notary-stamps/new-jersey.

How much can a New Jersey notary public charge for performing notarial acts?


A New Jersey notary may collect the following fees:

  • For administering oaths, taking affidavits, taking proofs of a deed, and taking acknowledgements: $2.50 per act
  • For administering oaths, taking affidavits, taking proofs of a deed, and taking acknowledgments of the grantors in the transfer of real estate, regardless of the number of such services performed in a single transaction to transfer real estate: $15
  • For administering oaths, taking affidavits, and taking acknowledgments of the mortgagors in the financing of real estate, regardless of the number of such services performed in a single transaction to finance real estate: $25

Is a notary journal required in New Jersey?


A notary journal (also known as a record book, log book, or register book) is your first line of defense in proving your innocence if a notarial act you performed is questioned or if you are requested to testify in a court of law about a notarial act you performed in the past. A properly recorded notarial act creates a paper trail that will help investigators locate and prosecute signers who have committed forgery and fraud. Properly recorded notarial acts provide evidence that you followed your state laws and notary’s best practices.

 

Notary journal requirements in New Jersey for traditional notarizations, electronic notarizations and remote online notarizations – A notary public is required to maintain a journal of all notarial acts performed. The journal may be created and maintained on a tangible medium or in an electronic format. A notary public shall maintain only one journal at a time to chronicle all notarial acts, whether those notarial acts are performed regarding tangible or electronic records. If the journal is maintained on a tangible medium, it shall be a permanent, bound register with consecutively numbered lines and consecutively numbered pages. If the journal is maintained in an electronic format, it shall be in a permanent, tamper-evident electronic format complying with any rules and regulations promulgated by the State Treasurer.


The American Association of Notaries offers a wide variety of notary journals.

Click here to purchase a tangible notary journal.

Click here to become a member and access our electronic notary journal.

What information must New Jersey notaries record in their notary journals?


New Jersey notaries must record the following information in their notary journals when performing traditional, electronic, and remote online notarizations:

  1. The date and time of the notarial act.
  2. The type of notarial act, including but not limited to the taking of an acknowledgment, the taking of a proof of a deed, the administration of an oath, or the taking of an affidavit.
  3. The name and address of each person for whom the notarial act is performed.
  4. A statement if the identity of the individual is based on personal knowledge.
  5. If the identity of the individual is based on satisfactory evidence, a brief description of the method of identification and the identification credential presented, if any, including, if applicable, the type, date of issuance, and date of expiration of an identification document, or the name and signature of any identifying witness and, if applicable, the type, date of issuance, and date of expiration of a document identifying the witness.
  6. An itemized list of all fees charged for the notarial act.

Where can I perform notarial acts in New Jersey?


You may perform notarial acts while you are physically anywhere within the geographic borders of the state of New Jersey.

What notarial acts can a New Jersey notary public perform?


A New Jersey notary public is authorized to perform the following notarial acts:

  • Take an acknowledgment
  • Administer an oath or affirmation
  • Take a verification on oath or affirmation
  •  Witness or attest a signature
  • Certify or attest a copy or deposition
  • Note a protest of a negotiable instrument

Can I perform electronic notarizations in New Jersey?


Yes. You must notify the state treasurer of your intentions to perform electronic notarizations.

What is the process to become a New Jersey electronic notary public?


To become an electronic notary in New Jersey, you must:

  1. Hold an existing commission as a traditional notary public.
  2. Select one or more tamper-evident technologies to perform notarial acts with respect to electronic records.
  3. Notify the state treasurer electronically at https://www.njportal.com/DOR/Notary that you will perform such notarial acts and identify the technologies you intend to use.

Can I perform remote online notarizations in New Jersey?


Yes. You can perform remote online notarizations if you have completed the appropriate steps to become a remote online notary in New Jersey. Effective October 20, 2021, notaries in New Jersey can apply to perform remote online notarizations (RONs) using a communication technology for a remotely located individual, regardless of whether the individual is physically located in New Jersey.

How do I become a remote online notary in New Jersey?


To become a remote online notary, you must:

  1. Hold an existing commission as a traditional notary public.
  2. Contract with a RON provider that meets state requirements.
  3. Notify the state treasurer electronically at https://www.njportal.com/DOR/Notary that you will perform such notarial acts and identify the technologies you intend to use.

You will need a computer, webcam, microphone, and secure internet connection to perform remote online notarizations. You must also purchase digital notary supplies, including an electronic stamp, electronic journal, and electronic signature.

How do I update my address on my New Jersey notary commission?


If your address on file with the state treasurer changes, you must update it online at https://www.njportal.com/DOR/Notary/

How do I change my name on my notary commission in New Jersey?


If you adopt a name different from what you used at the time you were commissioned, before you provide a signature to any record that you are authorized or required to sign as a notary public, you shall make, sign, and file a statement in writing and under oath on a form prescribed and furnished online at https://www.njportal.com/DOR/NotaryExam/ by the state treasurer, setting out the circumstances under which you have adopted the new name.

The statement shall indicate whether the new name has been adopted through marriage or civil union or by a change of name proceeding or otherwise and shall contain such other information as the state treasurer shall require.

Revised:


January 2023

Legal disclaimer: The information provided on this page is for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. We do not claim to be attorneys and we do not guarantee the accuracy, completeness, or reliability of the information provided. You should always seek the advice of a licensed attorney for any legal matters. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate notary laws governing your state. In no event shall the American Association of Notaries, its employees, or contractors be liable to you for any claims, penalties, losses, damages, or expenses, howsoever arising, including, and without limitation, direct or indirect loss, or consequential loss, out of or in connection with the use of the information contained on any of the American Association of Notaries website pages. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of their state’s notary authorities or attorneys if they have legal questions. 

Notary bonds and errors and omissions insurance policies provided by this insurance agency, American Association of Notaries, Inc., are underwritten by Western Surety Company, Universal Surety of America, or Surety Bonding Company of America, which are subsidiaries of CNA Surety.

Your choice regarding cookies on this site.

Our web site uses essential cookies to function and to optimize your site experience.
  • Click on the “Accept Optional Cookies” to agree that we may also use cookies to help us enhance site navigation and analyze performance and traffic on our website.
  • Click on the “Reject Optional Cookies” to disable all but essential cookies.
By visiting our website, you agree to our website Terms of Use and Cookie and Privacy Policy.