Categories

The Importance of Including Your Notary's Commission Expiration Date on Notarized Documents


A notarial certificate indicates what actions the document's preparer wants the notary to perform. The venue states that the notarization took place in a particular location that lies within the jurisdiction of the notary public. The presence of a notary commission expiration date shows that the document was notarized at a time when the notary held authority to notarize.


Your state may not require that your notary's commission expiration date be part of the required element of your notary seal or be present on the document in order for it to be valid. For instance, in Tennessee, the notarization is not invalidated if the commission expiration date is missing, but, if it is later determined that your commission had expired or been suspended or revoked at the time the document was notarized, the notarization would be invalid.

If there is not a line designated for the expiration date, you can simply print "My Commission Expires on" and the date under or near your signature. Unless your state law says otherwise, a rubber stamp with the relevant information may be used instead of printing by hand.

Even if a notary's commission expiration date is not required by law, many document recipients will reject the notarization if the expiration date is absent. It is considered a best practice to always include the notary commission expiration date on every document that you notarize.


This article is part of the series that began with What Does a Notary Public Do?

-- Tim Gatewood is a Contributing Writer with the American Association of Notaries

Legal Disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries is committed to providing accurate and up-to-date information. However, it is important to note that the information provided on this page is for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as legal advice. We do not claim to be attorneys and do not guarantee the accuracy, completeness, or reliability of the information provided. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate notary laws governing your state. You should always seek the advice of a licensed attorney for any legal matters. In no event shall the American Association of Notaries, its employees, or contractors be liable to you for any claims, penalties, losses, damages, or expenses, howsoever arising, including, and without limitation, direct or indirect loss, or consequential loss, out of or in connection with the use of the information contained on any of the American Association of Notaries website pages. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of their state’s notary authorities or attorneys if they have legal questions. 

Notary bonds and errors and omissions insurance policies provided by this insurance agency, American Association of Notaries, Inc., are underwritten by Western Surety Company, Universal Surety of America, or Surety Bonding Company of America, which are subsidiaries of CNA Surety.

Your choice regarding cookies on this site.

Our web site uses essential cookies to function and to optimize your site experience.
  • Click on the “Accept Optional Cookies” to agree that we may also use cookies to help us enhance site navigation and analyze performance and traffic on our website.
  • Click on the “Reject Optional Cookies” to disable all but essential cookies.
By visiting our website, you agree to our website Terms of Use and Cookie and Privacy Policy.