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Maintaining Your Notary Commission Tips


The Importance of the Venue on the Notarial Certificate


The venue is the portion of a notarial certificate describing the place where the notarization occurred, usually in the format "State of ___, County of ___". The venue may seem fairly insignificant, but it's actually important. Every notary has a limited jurisdiction in which they can perform notarial duties.

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Why Notary Training Is Crucial


There are a number of states that don't require any type of formal training to become a Notary Public. Texas is one of those states, and so is New Mexico. I have been asked during appointments, What does it take to become a Texas notary public? I have gotten to the point where I am almost embarrassed to answer this question. As notaries, we play such a vital role in the communities that we serve, it's hard to believe that there are no training requirements for some states.

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Protect Yourself: Report Stolen Notary Seals!


Have you recently left a job and had your seal or journal held back by your employer? Have you noticed that one or more of your seals is missing? If so, take immediate action to protect yourself.

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A Notary Signature is Essential on All Notarized Documents


The most critical of the five notary-specific elements on a notarized document is the notary signature. The lack of a notary signature is fatal to the notarization. It is essential that the notary always signs every notarial certificate that he or she notarizes. By signing the notary certificate, a notary is verifying that the venue, notary commission expiration date, and the notary certificate are true and correct.

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The Importance of Including Your Notary's Commission Expiration Date on Notarized Documents


A notarial certificate indicates what actions the document's preparer wants the notary to perform. The venue states that the notarization took place in a particular location that lies within the jurisdiction of the notary public. The presence of a notary commission expiration date shows that the document was notarized at a time when the notary held authority to notarize.

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The Notary Commission Belongs to the Notary


Becoming a notary public is a noteworthy undertaking; there are many reasons why a person may apply for a notary commission. Some apply for a notary commission to broaden their professional credentials and skills for employment. Others become notaries at the request of an employer or as a service to their business clients. Law firms, shipping centers, banks, and post offices are a few of the many types of businesses that have notaries on staff.

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How to Handle Lost or Stolen Notary Supplies


Notaries are responsible for safeguarding their notary supplies and protecting them from fraudulent use.

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Understanding the Importance of Your Notary Commission Name


Once you have received your notary commission from the state, you are ready to embark on your new career as a notary public.

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Employed Notaries - Your Notary Supplies Belong to the Notary


An employee notary is a notary who obtained a commission at the request of his or her employer. Perhaps your company transacts with clients, such as banks or insurance companies, that must have documents notarized on a regular basis.

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Legal Disclaimer: The American Association of Notaries seeks to provide timely articles for notaries to assist them with information for managing their notary businesses, enhancing their notary education, and securing their notary stamp and notary supplies. Every effort is made to provide accurate and complete information in the American Association of Notaries newsletters. However, we make no warrant, expressed or implied, and we do not represent, undertake, or guarantee that the information in the newsletter is correct, accurate, complete, or non-misleading. Information in this article is not intended as legal advice. We are not attorneys. We do not pretend to be attorneys. Though we will sometimes provide information regarding notaries' best practices, federal laws and statutes, and the laws and statutes of each state, we have gathered this information from a variety of sources and do not warrant its accuracy. In no event shall the American Association of Notaries, its employees, or contractors be liable to you for any claims, penalties, loss, damage, or expenses, howsoever arising, including, and without limitation, direct or indirect loss or consequential loss out of or in connection with the use of the information contained in the American Association of Notaries newsletters. It is your responsibility to know the appropriate notary laws governing your state. Notaries are advised to seek the advice of their states' notary authorities or attorneys in their state if they have legal questions. If a section of this disclaimer is determined by any court or other competent authority to be unlawful and/or unenforceable, the other sections of this disclaimer continue in effect.

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